Osmotic stress represses strigolactone biosynthesis in Lotus japonicus roots: exploring the interaction between strigolactones and ABA under abiotic stress

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/566142
Title:
Osmotic stress represses strigolactone biosynthesis in Lotus japonicus roots: exploring the interaction between strigolactones and ABA under abiotic stress
Authors:
Liu, Junwei; He, Hanzi; Vitali, Marco; Visentin, Ivan; Charnikhova, Tatsiana V.; Haider, Imran ( 0000-0002-0100-2513 ) ; Schubert, Andrea; Ruyter-Spira, Carolien P.; Bouwmeester, Harro J J; Lovisolo, Claudio; Cardinale, Francesca
Abstract:
Main conclusion: Strigolactone changes and cross talk with ABA unveil a picture of root-specific hormonal dynamics under stress.Abstract: Strigolactones (SLs) are carotenoid-derived hormones influencing diverse aspects of development and communication with (micro)organisms, and proposed as mediators of environmental stimuli in resource allocation processes; to contribute to adaptive adjustments, therefore, their pathway must be responsive to environmental cues. To investigate the relationship between SLs and abiotic stress in Lotus japonicus, we compared wild-type and SL-depleted plants, and studied SL metabolism in roots stressed osmotically and/or phosphate starved. SL-depleted plants showed increased stomatal conductance, both under normal and stress conditions, and impaired resistance to drought associated with slower stomatal closure in response to abscisic acid (ABA). This confirms that SLs contribute to drought resistance in species other than Arabidopsis. However, we also observed that osmotic stress rapidly and strongly decreased SL concentration in tissues and exudates of wild-type Lotus roots, by acting on the transcription of biosynthetic and transporter-encoding genes and independently of phosphate abundance. Pre-treatment with exogenous SLs inhibited the osmotic stress-induced ABA increase in wild-type roots and down-regulated the transcription of the ABA biosynthetic gene LjNCED2. We propose that a transcriptionally regulated, early SL decrease under osmotic stress is needed (but not sufficient) to allow the physiological increase of ABA in roots. This work shows that SL metabolism and effects on ABA are seemingly opposite in roots and shoots under stress.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Center for Desert Agriculture
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Planta
Issue Date:
26-Feb-2015
DOI:
10.1007/s00425-015-2266-8
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00320935
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Center for Desert Agriculture; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Junweien
dc.contributor.authorHe, Hanzien
dc.contributor.authorVitali, Marcoen
dc.contributor.authorVisentin, Ivanen
dc.contributor.authorCharnikhova, Tatsiana V.en
dc.contributor.authorHaider, Imranen
dc.contributor.authorSchubert, Andreaen
dc.contributor.authorRuyter-Spira, Carolien P.en
dc.contributor.authorBouwmeester, Harro J Jen
dc.contributor.authorLovisolo, Claudioen
dc.contributor.authorCardinale, Francescaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-12T09:29:54Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-12T09:29:54Zen
dc.date.issued2015-02-26en
dc.identifier.issn00320935en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00425-015-2266-8en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/566142en
dc.description.abstractMain conclusion: Strigolactone changes and cross talk with ABA unveil a picture of root-specific hormonal dynamics under stress.Abstract: Strigolactones (SLs) are carotenoid-derived hormones influencing diverse aspects of development and communication with (micro)organisms, and proposed as mediators of environmental stimuli in resource allocation processes; to contribute to adaptive adjustments, therefore, their pathway must be responsive to environmental cues. To investigate the relationship between SLs and abiotic stress in Lotus japonicus, we compared wild-type and SL-depleted plants, and studied SL metabolism in roots stressed osmotically and/or phosphate starved. SL-depleted plants showed increased stomatal conductance, both under normal and stress conditions, and impaired resistance to drought associated with slower stomatal closure in response to abscisic acid (ABA). This confirms that SLs contribute to drought resistance in species other than Arabidopsis. However, we also observed that osmotic stress rapidly and strongly decreased SL concentration in tissues and exudates of wild-type Lotus roots, by acting on the transcription of biosynthetic and transporter-encoding genes and independently of phosphate abundance. Pre-treatment with exogenous SLs inhibited the osmotic stress-induced ABA increase in wild-type roots and down-regulated the transcription of the ABA biosynthetic gene LjNCED2. We propose that a transcriptionally regulated, early SL decrease under osmotic stress is needed (but not sufficient) to allow the physiological increase of ABA in roots. This work shows that SL metabolism and effects on ABA are seemingly opposite in roots and shoots under stress.en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.subjectCarotenoid cleavage enzymesen
dc.subjectCCD7en
dc.subjectCCD8en
dc.subjectD27en
dc.subjectDroughten
dc.subjectGR24 (synthetic strigolactone analogue)en
dc.subjectMAX1en
dc.subjectNCEDen
dc.subjectPDR1en
dc.subjectPhosphate starvationen
dc.subjectStomatal conductanceen
dc.titleOsmotic stress represses strigolactone biosynthesis in Lotus japonicus roots: exploring the interaction between strigolactones and ABA under abiotic stressen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Desert Agricultureen
dc.identifier.journalPlantaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Agricultural, Forest and Food Sciences (DISAFA), University of Turin, Largo P. Braccini 2Grugliasco, TO, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory of Plant Physiology, Wageningen University, Droevendaalsesteeg 1Wageningen, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionBusiness Unit Bioscience, Plant Research International, Droevendaalsesteeg 1Wageningen, Netherlandsen
kaust.authorHaider, Imranen
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