Development of microsatellite markers for globally distributed populations of the threatened silky shark, Carcharhinus falciformis

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/566097
Title:
Development of microsatellite markers for globally distributed populations of the threatened silky shark, Carcharhinus falciformis
Authors:
O’Bryhim, J. R.; O’Bryhim, J. R.; Spät, Julia L.Y. ( 0000-0001-8703-1472 ) ; Hyde, J. R.; Jones, K. L.; Adams, D. H.; Lance, S. L.
Abstract:
Eighteen microsatellite loci were developed for the silky shark Carcharhinus falciformis and screened across a total of 53 individuals from the western Atlantic Ocean, Eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean, and Red Sea. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 3 to 19, observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.158 to 0.917, and the probability of identity values ranged from 0.010 to 0.460. Though believed to be one of the most abundant species of large sharks, C. falciformis were recently listed as “near threatened” globally and “vulnerable” in the Eastern Tropical Pacific by the IUCN, due to reductions in catch rates from both target and non-target fisheries (Dulvy et al. in Aquat Conserv 18:459–482, 2008). Very little information exists about the population structure and genetic diversity of C. falciformis around the world. These new loci will provide effective tools for examining the sustainability of this declining species. © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Conservation Genetics Resources
Issue Date:
5-Dec-2014
DOI:
10.1007/s12686-014-0396-0
Type:
Article
ISSN:
18777252
Sponsors:
Manuscript preparation was partially supported by the DOE under Award Number DE-FC09-07SR22506 to the University of Georgia Research Foundation. Bioinformatics support came from Biostatistics/Bioinformatics Shared Resource of the University of Colorado Cancer Center (5P30CA046934). InterAmerican Tropical Tuna Commission fishery observers provided samples from the Eastern Tropical Pacific.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO’Bryhim, J. R.en
dc.contributor.authorO’Bryhim, J. R.en
dc.contributor.authorSpät, Julia L.Y.en
dc.contributor.authorHyde, J. R.en
dc.contributor.authorJones, K. L.en
dc.contributor.authorAdams, D. H.en
dc.contributor.authorLance, S. L.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-12T09:28:08Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-12T09:28:08Zen
dc.date.issued2014-12-05en
dc.identifier.issn18777252en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12686-014-0396-0en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/566097en
dc.description.abstractEighteen microsatellite loci were developed for the silky shark Carcharhinus falciformis and screened across a total of 53 individuals from the western Atlantic Ocean, Eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean, and Red Sea. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 3 to 19, observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.158 to 0.917, and the probability of identity values ranged from 0.010 to 0.460. Though believed to be one of the most abundant species of large sharks, C. falciformis were recently listed as “near threatened” globally and “vulnerable” in the Eastern Tropical Pacific by the IUCN, due to reductions in catch rates from both target and non-target fisheries (Dulvy et al. in Aquat Conserv 18:459–482, 2008). Very little information exists about the population structure and genetic diversity of C. falciformis around the world. These new loci will provide effective tools for examining the sustainability of this declining species. © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.en
dc.description.sponsorshipManuscript preparation was partially supported by the DOE under Award Number DE-FC09-07SR22506 to the University of Georgia Research Foundation. Bioinformatics support came from Biostatistics/Bioinformatics Shared Resource of the University of Colorado Cancer Center (5P30CA046934). InterAmerican Tropical Tuna Commission fishery observers provided samples from the Eastern Tropical Pacific.en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.subjectCarcharhinus falciformisen
dc.subjectIlluminaen
dc.subjectMicrosatelliteen
dc.subjectPAL_FINDERen
dc.subjectPCR primersen
dc.subjectSSRen
dc.titleDevelopment of microsatellite markers for globally distributed populations of the threatened silky shark, Carcharhinus falciformisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalConservation Genetics Resourcesen
dc.contributor.institutionSavannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of GeorgiaAiken, SC, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason UniversityFairfax, VA, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionSouthwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, 8901 La Jolla Shores Dr.La Jolla, CA, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Colorado School of MedicineAurora, CO, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionFish and Wildlife Research Institute, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation CommissionMelbourne, FL, United Statesen
kaust.authorSpät, Julia L.Y.en
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