ArchField in Jordan

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/566073
Title:
ArchField in Jordan
Authors:
Smith, Neil; Levy, Thomas E.
Abstract:
Archaeological excavations are the last stronghold of analog recording in this era of digital archaeology. Around the world perhaps at this very moment excavations are occurring where artifacts, architecture, stratigraphic layers, and other archaeological datasets are recorded using only the paper and pen. Every evening after an excavation, supervisors and their volunteers huddle over their illuminated graph paper to convert their written notes and drawings into daily top plans. It is these paper top plans, journal notes, and overstuffed binders filled with printed spreadsheets that much later are meticulously entered into a computer. At this point, long after the season of excavation has been wrapped up, that the drudgery of data entry begins, which with large excavations can take months to digitize, process, and produce data that can be digitally analyzed. As multiple seasons of excavations compound, the delay between field excavation, ability to analyze and to publish increases exponentially.
KAUST Department:
Visual Computing Center (VCC)
Publisher:
The American Schools of Oriental Research
Journal:
Near Eastern Archaeology
Issue Date:
Sep-2014
DOI:
10.5615/neareastarch.77.3.0166
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1094-2076; 2325-5404
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Visual Computing Center (VCC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Neilen
dc.contributor.authorLevy, Thomas E.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-12T09:27:06Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-12T09:27:06Zen
dc.date.issued2014-09en
dc.identifier.issn1094-2076en
dc.identifier.issn2325-5404en
dc.identifier.doi10.5615/neareastarch.77.3.0166en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/566073en
dc.description.abstractArchaeological excavations are the last stronghold of analog recording in this era of digital archaeology. Around the world perhaps at this very moment excavations are occurring where artifacts, architecture, stratigraphic layers, and other archaeological datasets are recorded using only the paper and pen. Every evening after an excavation, supervisors and their volunteers huddle over their illuminated graph paper to convert their written notes and drawings into daily top plans. It is these paper top plans, journal notes, and overstuffed binders filled with printed spreadsheets that much later are meticulously entered into a computer. At this point, long after the season of excavation has been wrapped up, that the drudgery of data entry begins, which with large excavations can take months to digitize, process, and produce data that can be digitally analyzed. As multiple seasons of excavations compound, the delay between field excavation, ability to analyze and to publish increases exponentially.en
dc.publisherThe American Schools of Oriental Researchen
dc.titleArchField in Jordanen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentVisual Computing Center (VCC)en
dc.identifier.journalNear Eastern Archaeologyen
kaust.authorSmith, Neilen
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