A deep sea community at the Kebrit brine pool in the Red Sea

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/566061
Title:
A deep sea community at the Kebrit brine pool in the Red Sea
Authors:
Vestheim, Hege; Kaartvedt, Stein ( 0000-0002-8793-2948 )
Abstract:
Approximately 25 deep sea brine pools occur along the mid axis of the Red Sea. These hypersaline, anoxic, and acidic environments have previously been reported to host diverse microbial communities. We visited the Kebrit brine pool in April 2013 and found macrofauna present just above the brine–seawater interface (~1465 m). In particular, inactive sulfur chimneys had associated epifauna of sea anemones, sabellid type polychaetes, and hydroids, and infauna consisting of capitellid polychaetes, gastropods of the genus Laeviphitus (fam. Elachisinidae), and top snails of the family Cocculinidae. The deep Red Sea generally is regarded as extremely poor in benthos. We hypothesize that the periphery along the Kebrit holds increased biomass and biodiversity that are sustained by prokaryotes associated with the brine pool or co-occurring seeps.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Publisher:
Springer Science + Business Media
Journal:
Marine Biodiversity
Issue Date:
26-Feb-2015
DOI:
10.1007/s12526-015-0321-0
Type:
Article
ISSN:
18671616
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVestheim, Hegeen
dc.contributor.authorKaartvedt, Steinen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-12T09:26:35Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-12T09:26:35Zen
dc.date.issued2015-02-26en
dc.identifier.issn18671616en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12526-015-0321-0en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/566061en
dc.description.abstractApproximately 25 deep sea brine pools occur along the mid axis of the Red Sea. These hypersaline, anoxic, and acidic environments have previously been reported to host diverse microbial communities. We visited the Kebrit brine pool in April 2013 and found macrofauna present just above the brine–seawater interface (~1465 m). In particular, inactive sulfur chimneys had associated epifauna of sea anemones, sabellid type polychaetes, and hydroids, and infauna consisting of capitellid polychaetes, gastropods of the genus Laeviphitus (fam. Elachisinidae), and top snails of the family Cocculinidae. The deep Red Sea generally is regarded as extremely poor in benthos. We hypothesize that the periphery along the Kebrit holds increased biomass and biodiversity that are sustained by prokaryotes associated with the brine pool or co-occurring seeps.en
dc.publisherSpringer Science + Business Mediaen
dc.subjectBenthic faunaen
dc.subjectCnidariansen
dc.subjectDHABen
dc.subjectInactive chimneysen
dc.subjectMolluscsen
dc.subjectPolychaetesen
dc.titleA deep sea community at the Kebrit brine pool in the Red Seaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalMarine Biodiversityen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biosciences, University of Oslo, PO Box 1066Blindern, Oslo, Norwayen
kaust.authorVestheim, Hegeen
kaust.authorKaartvedt, Steinen
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