Reasons for the Fast Growing Seawater Desalination Capacity in Algeria

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/566021
Title:
Reasons for the Fast Growing Seawater Desalination Capacity in Algeria
Authors:
Drouiche, Nadjib; Ghaffour, Noreddine ( 0000-0003-2095-4736 ) ; Naceur, Mohamed Wahib; Mahmoudi, Hacène; Ouslimane, Tarik
Abstract:
Seawater/brackish water desalination has been widely adopted by the Algerian Government in the last few years to supply potable water to municipality for various purposes mainly for domestic and industrial uses especially in areas where demand is high due to shortage of fresh water resources, rapid population growth and development of industry and tourism. Ten years ago, desalination was confined to the industrial use only especially in oil and gas industry as the country was relying on rain water and other available sources to supply fresh water to municipalities. Due to chronic drought conditions, the Ministry of Water Resources reviewed the national water strategy and a strong option for desalination was adopted where an ambitious program was thus put into action. Sixteen mega-plants, with capacities ranging from 100,000 to 500,000 m3 per day, primarily based on Reverse Osmosis technology, were launched in the last few years making the Algerian desalination program one of the world's fastest growing markets. Five desalination plants, including the Africa's largest seawater reverse osmosis project with a total capacity of 200,000 m3 per day, are already in operation and the remaining projects are either under construction or in commissioning. An integrated water resources management was also adopted as additional option to cuter the increasing water demand as there is also a great potential for water reuse and conventional water treatment. An additional benefit of this would be reducing the volume of treated wastewater disposed into the environment. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Water Resources Management
Issue Date:
24-May-2011
DOI:
10.1007/s11269-011-9836-8
Type:
Article
ISSN:
09204741
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDrouiche, Nadjiben
dc.contributor.authorGhaffour, Noreddineen
dc.contributor.authorNaceur, Mohamed Wahiben
dc.contributor.authorMahmoudi, Hacèneen
dc.contributor.authorOuslimane, Tariken
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-12T08:59:49Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-12T08:59:49Zen
dc.date.issued2011-05-24en
dc.identifier.issn09204741en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11269-011-9836-8en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/566021en
dc.description.abstractSeawater/brackish water desalination has been widely adopted by the Algerian Government in the last few years to supply potable water to municipality for various purposes mainly for domestic and industrial uses especially in areas where demand is high due to shortage of fresh water resources, rapid population growth and development of industry and tourism. Ten years ago, desalination was confined to the industrial use only especially in oil and gas industry as the country was relying on rain water and other available sources to supply fresh water to municipalities. Due to chronic drought conditions, the Ministry of Water Resources reviewed the national water strategy and a strong option for desalination was adopted where an ambitious program was thus put into action. Sixteen mega-plants, with capacities ranging from 100,000 to 500,000 m3 per day, primarily based on Reverse Osmosis technology, were launched in the last few years making the Algerian desalination program one of the world's fastest growing markets. Five desalination plants, including the Africa's largest seawater reverse osmosis project with a total capacity of 200,000 m3 per day, are already in operation and the remaining projects are either under construction or in commissioning. An integrated water resources management was also adopted as additional option to cuter the increasing water demand as there is also a great potential for water reuse and conventional water treatment. An additional benefit of this would be reducing the volume of treated wastewater disposed into the environment. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.subjectCoastal regionen
dc.subjectDesalinationen
dc.subjectWater reuseen
dc.subjectWater shortageen
dc.subjectWater supplyen
dc.titleReasons for the Fast Growing Seawater Desalination Capacity in Algeriaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.identifier.journalWater Resources Managementen
dc.contributor.institutionSilicon Technology Development Unit, Department of Environmental Engineering, 2, Bd Frantz Fanon BP140 Alger-7-mervielles, 16000 Algiers, Algeriaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemical Engineering, Saad Dahlab University of Blida, Blida, Algeriaen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity Hassiba Ben Bouali, BP 151 Chlef, Algeriaen
dc.contributor.institutionRenewable Energy Research Centre, CDER, Bouzareah, Algiers, Algeriaen
kaust.authorGhaffour, Noreddineen
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