Questing for circadian dependence in ST-segment-elevation acute myocardial infarction: A multicentric and multiethnic study

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/566020
Title:
Questing for circadian dependence in ST-segment-elevation acute myocardial infarction: A multicentric and multiethnic study
Authors:
Ammirati, Enrico; Cristell, Nicole A.; Cianflone, Domenico; Vermi, Anna Chiara; Marenzi, Giancarlo Carlo; De Metrio, Monica; Uren, Neal G.; Hu, Dayi; Ravasi, Timothy ( 0000-0002-9950-465X ) ; Maseri, Attilio; Cannistraci, Carlo
Abstract:
Rationale: Four monocentric studies reported that circadian rhythms can affect left ventricular infarct size after ST-segment-elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI). Objective: To further validate the circadian dependence of infarct size after STEMI in a multicentric and multiethnic population. Methods and Results: We analyzed a prospective cohort of subjects with first STEMI from the First Acute Myocardial Infarction study that enrolled 1099 patients (ischemic time <6 hours) in Italy, Scotland, and China. We confirmed a circadian variation of STEMI incidence with an increased morning incidence (from 6:00 am till noon). We investigated the presence of circadian dependence of infarct size plotting the peak creatine kinase against time onset of ischemia. In addition, we studied the patients from the 3 countries separately, including 624 Italians; all patients were treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. We adopted several levels of analysis with different inclusion criteria consistent with previous studies. In all the analyses, we did not find a clear-cut circadian dependence of infarct size after STEMI. Conclusions: Although the circadian dependence of infarct size supported by previous studies poses an intriguing hypothesis, we were unable to converge toward their conclusions in a multicentric and multiethnic setting. Parameters that vary as a function of latitude could potentially obscure the circadian variations observed in monocentric studies. We believe that, to assess whether circadian rhythms can affect the infarct size, future study design should not only include larger samples but also aim to untangle the molecular time-dynamic mechanisms underlying such a relation. © 2013 American Heart Association, Inc.
KAUST Department:
Applied Mathematics and Computational Science Program; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC); Integrative Systems Biology Lab
Publisher:
Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
Journal:
Circulation Research
Issue Date:
9-May-2013
DOI:
10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.112.300778
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00097330
Sponsors:
Dr Ammirati received financial support from Giovane Ricercatore 2009 Grant from Italian Health Ministry (project code GR-2009-1608780). Dr Cannistraci receives financial support from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology. The other authors report no conflicts.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Applied Mathematics and Computational Science Program; Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAmmirati, Enricoen
dc.contributor.authorCristell, Nicole A.en
dc.contributor.authorCianflone, Domenicoen
dc.contributor.authorVermi, Anna Chiaraen
dc.contributor.authorMarenzi, Giancarlo Carloen
dc.contributor.authorDe Metrio, Monicaen
dc.contributor.authorUren, Neal G.en
dc.contributor.authorHu, Dayien
dc.contributor.authorRavasi, Timothyen
dc.contributor.authorMaseri, Attilioen
dc.contributor.authorCannistraci, Carloen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-12T08:59:45Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-12T08:59:45Zen
dc.date.issued2013-05-09en
dc.identifier.issn00097330en
dc.identifier.doi10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.112.300778en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/566020en
dc.description.abstractRationale: Four monocentric studies reported that circadian rhythms can affect left ventricular infarct size after ST-segment-elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI). Objective: To further validate the circadian dependence of infarct size after STEMI in a multicentric and multiethnic population. Methods and Results: We analyzed a prospective cohort of subjects with first STEMI from the First Acute Myocardial Infarction study that enrolled 1099 patients (ischemic time <6 hours) in Italy, Scotland, and China. We confirmed a circadian variation of STEMI incidence with an increased morning incidence (from 6:00 am till noon). We investigated the presence of circadian dependence of infarct size plotting the peak creatine kinase against time onset of ischemia. In addition, we studied the patients from the 3 countries separately, including 624 Italians; all patients were treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. We adopted several levels of analysis with different inclusion criteria consistent with previous studies. In all the analyses, we did not find a clear-cut circadian dependence of infarct size after STEMI. Conclusions: Although the circadian dependence of infarct size supported by previous studies poses an intriguing hypothesis, we were unable to converge toward their conclusions in a multicentric and multiethnic setting. Parameters that vary as a function of latitude could potentially obscure the circadian variations observed in monocentric studies. We believe that, to assess whether circadian rhythms can affect the infarct size, future study design should not only include larger samples but also aim to untangle the molecular time-dynamic mechanisms underlying such a relation. © 2013 American Heart Association, Inc.en
dc.description.sponsorshipDr Ammirati received financial support from Giovane Ricercatore 2009 Grant from Italian Health Ministry (project code GR-2009-1608780). Dr Cannistraci receives financial support from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology. The other authors report no conflicts.en
dc.publisherOvid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)en
dc.subjectAcute myocardial infarctionen
dc.subjectCircadian rhythmen
dc.subjectMyocardial injuryen
dc.subjectSystems biologyen
dc.subjectTime onset of myocardial infarctionen
dc.titleQuesting for circadian dependence in ST-segment-elevation acute myocardial infarction: A multicentric and multiethnic studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentApplied Mathematics and Computational Science Programen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentComputational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentIntegrative Systems Biology Laben
dc.identifier.journalCirculation Researchen
dc.contributor.institutionIst Sci San Raffaele, I-20132 Milan, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniv Vita Salute San Raffaele, I-20132 Milan, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionOsped Niguarda Ca Granda, Azienda Osped, Heart Transplantat Div, Milan, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionHeart Care Fdn, Florence, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionIRCCS, Ctr Cardiol Monzino, Milan, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionUniv Milan, Milan, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionRoyal Infirm Edinburgh NHS Trust, Dept Cardiol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotlanden
dc.contributor.institutionPeking Univ, Peoples Hosp, Ctr Heart, Beijing 100871, Peoples R Chinaen
dc.contributor.institutionUniv Calif San Diego, Dept Med & Bioengn, La Jolla, CA 92093 USAen
kaust.authorRavasi, Timothyen
kaust.authorCannistraci, Carloen
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