Oasis desert farming selects environment-specific date palm root endophytic communities and cultivable bacteria that promote resistance to drought

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/566005
Title:
Oasis desert farming selects environment-specific date palm root endophytic communities and cultivable bacteria that promote resistance to drought
Authors:
Cherif, Hanene; Marasco, Ramona ( 0000-0003-4776-7519 ) ; Rolli, Eleonora; Ferjani, Raoudha; Fusi, Marco ( 0000-0001-7433-2487 ) ; Soussi, Asma; Mapelli, Francesca; Blilou, Ikram; Borin, Sara; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Cherif, Ameur; Daffonchio, Daniele ( 0000-0003-0947-925X ) ; Ouzari, Hadda
Abstract:
Oases are desert-farming agro-ecosystems, where date palm (Phoenix dactyliferaL.) plays a keystone role in offsetting the effects of drought and maintaining a suitable microclimate for agriculture. At present, abundance, diversity and plant growth promotion (PGP) of date palm root-associated bacteria remain unknown. Considering the environmental pressure determined by the water scarcity in the desert environments, we hypothesized that bacteria associated with date palm roots improve plant resistance to drought. Here, the ecology of date palm root endophytes from oases in the Tunisian Sahara was studied with emphasis on their capacity to promote growth under drought. Endophytic communities segregated along a north-south gradient in correlation with geo-climatic parameters. Screening of 120 endophytes indicated that date palm roots select for bacteria with multiple PGP traits. Bacteria rapidly cross-colonized the root tissues of different species of plants, including the original Tunisian date palm cultivar, Saudi Arabian cultivars and Arabidopsis. Selected endophytes significantly increased the biomass of date palms exposed to repeated drought stress periods during a 9-month greenhouse experiment. Overall, results indicate that date palm roots shape endophytic communities that are capable to promote plant growth under drought conditions, thereby contributing an essential ecological service to the entire oasis ecosystem. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Bioscience Program; Extreme Systems Microbiology Lab
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Environmental Microbiology Reports
Issue Date:
21-Jul-2015
DOI:
10.1111/1758-2229.12304
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1758-2229
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Bioscience Program; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCherif, Haneneen
dc.contributor.authorMarasco, Ramonaen
dc.contributor.authorRolli, Eleonoraen
dc.contributor.authorFerjani, Raoudhaen
dc.contributor.authorFusi, Marcoen
dc.contributor.authorSoussi, Asmaen
dc.contributor.authorMapelli, Francescaen
dc.contributor.authorBlilou, Ikramen
dc.contributor.authorBorin, Saraen
dc.contributor.authorBoudabous, Abdellatifen
dc.contributor.authorCherif, Ameuren
dc.contributor.authorDaffonchio, Danieleen
dc.contributor.authorOuzari, Haddaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-12T08:59:03Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-12T08:59:03Zen
dc.date.issued2015-07-21en
dc.identifier.issn1758-2229en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1758-2229.12304en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/566005en
dc.description.abstractOases are desert-farming agro-ecosystems, where date palm (Phoenix dactyliferaL.) plays a keystone role in offsetting the effects of drought and maintaining a suitable microclimate for agriculture. At present, abundance, diversity and plant growth promotion (PGP) of date palm root-associated bacteria remain unknown. Considering the environmental pressure determined by the water scarcity in the desert environments, we hypothesized that bacteria associated with date palm roots improve plant resistance to drought. Here, the ecology of date palm root endophytes from oases in the Tunisian Sahara was studied with emphasis on their capacity to promote growth under drought. Endophytic communities segregated along a north-south gradient in correlation with geo-climatic parameters. Screening of 120 endophytes indicated that date palm roots select for bacteria with multiple PGP traits. Bacteria rapidly cross-colonized the root tissues of different species of plants, including the original Tunisian date palm cultivar, Saudi Arabian cultivars and Arabidopsis. Selected endophytes significantly increased the biomass of date palms exposed to repeated drought stress periods during a 9-month greenhouse experiment. Overall, results indicate that date palm roots shape endophytic communities that are capable to promote plant growth under drought conditions, thereby contributing an essential ecological service to the entire oasis ecosystem. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.titleOasis desert farming selects environment-specific date palm root endophytic communities and cultivable bacteria that promote resistance to droughten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentBioscience Programen
dc.contributor.departmentExtreme Systems Microbiology Laben
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental Microbiology Reportsen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
kaust.authorMarasco, Ramonaen
kaust.authorFusi, Marcoen
kaust.authorDaffonchio, Danieleen
kaust.authorSoussi, Asmaen
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