Forward osmosis niches in seawater desalination and wastewater reuse

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/565978
Title:
Forward osmosis niches in seawater desalination and wastewater reuse
Authors:
Valladares Linares, Rodrigo ( 0000-0003-3790-3249 ) ; Li, Zhenyu; Sarp, Sarper; Bucs, Szilard; Amy, Gary L.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S. ( 0000-0003-2668-2057 )
Abstract:
This review focuses on the present status of forward osmosis (FO) niches in two main areas: seawater desalination and wastewater reuse. Specific applications for desalination and impaired-quality water treatment and reuse are described, as well as the benefits, advantages, challenges, costs and knowledge gaps on FO hybrid systems are discussed. FO can play a role as a bridge to integrate upstream and downstream water treatment processes, to reduce the energy consumption of the entire desalination or water recovery and reuse processes, thus achieving a sustainable solution for the water-energy nexus. FO hybrid membrane systems showed to have advantages over traditional membrane process like high pressure reverse osmosis and nanofiltration for desalination and wastewater treatment: (i) chemical storage and feed water systems may be reduced for capital, operational and maintenance cost, (ii) water quality is improved, (iii) reduced process piping costs, (iv) more flexible treatment units, and (v) higher overall sustainability of the desalination and wastewater treatment process. Nevertheless, major challenges make FO systems not yet a commercially viable technology, the most critical being the development of a high flux membrane, capable of maintaining an elevated salt rejection and a reduced internal concentration polarization effect, and the availability of appropriate draw solutions (cost effective and non-toxic), which can be recirculated via an efficient recovery process. This review article highlights the features of hybrid FO systems and specifically provides the state-of-the-art applications in the water industry in a novel classification and based on the latest developments toward scaling up these systems.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Water Research
Issue Date:
Dec-2014
DOI:
10.1016/j.watres.2014.08.021
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00431354
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorValladares Linares, Rodrigoen
dc.contributor.authorLi, Zhenyuen
dc.contributor.authorSarp, Sarperen
dc.contributor.authorBucs, Szilarden
dc.contributor.authorAmy, Gary L.en
dc.contributor.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-12T08:57:50Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-12T08:57:50Zen
dc.date.issued2014-12en
dc.identifier.issn00431354en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2014.08.021en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/565978en
dc.description.abstractThis review focuses on the present status of forward osmosis (FO) niches in two main areas: seawater desalination and wastewater reuse. Specific applications for desalination and impaired-quality water treatment and reuse are described, as well as the benefits, advantages, challenges, costs and knowledge gaps on FO hybrid systems are discussed. FO can play a role as a bridge to integrate upstream and downstream water treatment processes, to reduce the energy consumption of the entire desalination or water recovery and reuse processes, thus achieving a sustainable solution for the water-energy nexus. FO hybrid membrane systems showed to have advantages over traditional membrane process like high pressure reverse osmosis and nanofiltration for desalination and wastewater treatment: (i) chemical storage and feed water systems may be reduced for capital, operational and maintenance cost, (ii) water quality is improved, (iii) reduced process piping costs, (iv) more flexible treatment units, and (v) higher overall sustainability of the desalination and wastewater treatment process. Nevertheless, major challenges make FO systems not yet a commercially viable technology, the most critical being the development of a high flux membrane, capable of maintaining an elevated salt rejection and a reduced internal concentration polarization effect, and the availability of appropriate draw solutions (cost effective and non-toxic), which can be recirculated via an efficient recovery process. This review article highlights the features of hybrid FO systems and specifically provides the state-of-the-art applications in the water industry in a novel classification and based on the latest developments toward scaling up these systems.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectDesalinationen
dc.subjectDraw solutionen
dc.subjectForward osmosisen
dc.subjectPressure retarded osmosisen
dc.subjectWastewater recoveryen
dc.titleForward osmosis niches in seawater desalination and wastewater reuseen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.identifier.journalWater Researchen
dc.contributor.institutionDelft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Department of BiotechnologyDelft, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionGS Engineering and Construction, Environmental Process Engineering Team, Grand Seoul Building, 33Jongno-gu, Seoul, South Koreaen
dc.contributor.institutionWetsus, Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water TechnologyLeeuwarden, Netherlandsen
kaust.authorValladares Linares, Rodrigoen
kaust.authorLi, Zhenyuen
kaust.authorAmy, Gary L.en
kaust.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.en
kaust.authorBucs, Szilarden
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