A model of electrostatically actuated MEMS and carbon nanotubes resonators for biological mass detection

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/565016
Title:
A model of electrostatically actuated MEMS and carbon nanotubes resonators for biological mass detection
Authors:
Bouchaala, Adam M.; Younis, Mohammad I. ( 0000-0002-9491-1838 )
Abstract:
We investigate the dynamics of electrically actuated Micro and Nano (Carbon nanotube (CNT)) cantilever beams implemented as resonant sensors for mass detection of biological elements. The beams are modeled using an Euler-Bernoulli beam theory including the nonlinear electrostatic forces and the added biological elements, which are modeled as a discrete point mass. A multi-mode Galerkin procedure is utilized to derive a reduced-order model, which is used for the dynamic simulations. The frequency shifts due to added mass of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) are calculated for the primary and higher order modes of vibrations. Also, analytical expressions of the natural frequency shift under dc voltage and added mass have been developed. We found that using higher-order modes of vibration of MEMS beams or miniaturizing the size of the beam to Nano scale leads to significant improved sensitivity. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.
KAUST Department:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Mechanical Engineering Program
Publisher:
Springer Science + Business Media
Journal:
Design and Modeling of Mechanical Systems - II
Conference/Event name:
6th International Congress on Design and Modeling of Mechanical Systems, CMSM 2015
Issue Date:
2015
DOI:
10.1007/978-3-319-17527-0_50
Type:
Conference Paper
ISSN:
01708643
ISBN:
9783319175263
Appears in Collections:
Conference Papers; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Mechanical Engineering Program

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBouchaala, Adam M.en
dc.contributor.authorYounis, Mohammad I.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-04T07:28:19Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-04T07:28:19Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.isbn9783319175263en
dc.identifier.issn01708643en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-17527-0_50en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/565016en
dc.description.abstractWe investigate the dynamics of electrically actuated Micro and Nano (Carbon nanotube (CNT)) cantilever beams implemented as resonant sensors for mass detection of biological elements. The beams are modeled using an Euler-Bernoulli beam theory including the nonlinear electrostatic forces and the added biological elements, which are modeled as a discrete point mass. A multi-mode Galerkin procedure is utilized to derive a reduced-order model, which is used for the dynamic simulations. The frequency shifts due to added mass of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) are calculated for the primary and higher order modes of vibrations. Also, analytical expressions of the natural frequency shift under dc voltage and added mass have been developed. We found that using higher-order modes of vibration of MEMS beams or miniaturizing the size of the beam to Nano scale leads to significant improved sensitivity. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.en
dc.publisherSpringer Science + Business Mediaen
dc.subjectCNTen
dc.subjectE. colien
dc.subjectMass detectionen
dc.subjectMEMSen
dc.subjectPSAen
dc.subjectResonatoren
dc.titleA model of electrostatically actuated MEMS and carbon nanotubes resonators for biological mass detectionen
dc.typeConference Paperen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineering Programen
dc.identifier.journalDesign and Modeling of Mechanical Systems - IIen
dc.conference.date23 March 2015 through 25 March 2015en
dc.conference.name6th International Congress on Design and Modeling of Mechanical Systems, CMSM 2015en
kaust.authorYounis, Mohammad I.en
kaust.authorBouchaala, Adam M.en
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