Molding acoustic, electromagnetic and water waves with a single cloak

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/564186
Title:
Molding acoustic, electromagnetic and water waves with a single cloak
Authors:
Xu, Jun; Jiang, Xu; Fang, Nicholas; Georget, Elodie; Abdeddaim, Redha; Geffrin, Jean Michel; Farhat, Mohamed; Sabouroux, Pierre; Enoch, Stefan; Guenneau, Sébastien
Abstract:
We describe two experiments demonstrating that a cylindrical cloak formerly introduced for linear surface liquid waves works equally well for sound and electromagnetic waves. This structured cloak behaves like an acoustic cloak with an effective anisotropic density and an electromagnetic cloak with an effective anisotropic permittivity, respectively. Measured forward scattering for pressure and magnetic fields are in good agreement and provide first evidence of broadband cloaking. Microwave experiments and 3D electromagnetic wave simulations further confirm reduced forward and backscattering when a rectangular metallic obstacle is surrounded by the structured cloak for cloaking frequencies between 2.6 and 7.0 GHz. This suggests, as supported by 2D finite element simulations, sound waves are cloaked between 3 and 8 KHz and linear surface liquid waves between 5 and 16 Hz. Moreover, microwave experiments show the field is reduced by 10 to 30 dB inside the invisibility region, which suggests the multi-wave cloak could be used as a protection against water, sonic or microwaves. © 2015, Nature Publishing Group. All rights reserved.
KAUST Department:
Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division; Electrical Engineering Program
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Journal:
Scientific Reports
Issue Date:
9-Jun-2015
DOI:
10.1038/srep10678
Type:
Article
ISSN:
20452322
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Electrical Engineering Program; Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorXu, Junen
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Xuen
dc.contributor.authorFang, Nicholasen
dc.contributor.authorGeorget, Elodieen
dc.contributor.authorAbdeddaim, Redhaen
dc.contributor.authorGeffrin, Jean Michelen
dc.contributor.authorFarhat, Mohameden
dc.contributor.authorSabouroux, Pierreen
dc.contributor.authorEnoch, Stefanen
dc.contributor.authorGuenneau, Sébastienen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T12:35:35Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T12:35:35Zen
dc.date.issued2015-06-09en
dc.identifier.issn20452322en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep10678en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/564186en
dc.description.abstractWe describe two experiments demonstrating that a cylindrical cloak formerly introduced for linear surface liquid waves works equally well for sound and electromagnetic waves. This structured cloak behaves like an acoustic cloak with an effective anisotropic density and an electromagnetic cloak with an effective anisotropic permittivity, respectively. Measured forward scattering for pressure and magnetic fields are in good agreement and provide first evidence of broadband cloaking. Microwave experiments and 3D electromagnetic wave simulations further confirm reduced forward and backscattering when a rectangular metallic obstacle is surrounded by the structured cloak for cloaking frequencies between 2.6 and 7.0 GHz. This suggests, as supported by 2D finite element simulations, sound waves are cloaked between 3 and 8 KHz and linear surface liquid waves between 5 and 16 Hz. Moreover, microwave experiments show the field is reduced by 10 to 30 dB inside the invisibility region, which suggests the multi-wave cloak could be used as a protection against water, sonic or microwaves. © 2015, Nature Publishing Group. All rights reserved.en
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.titleMolding acoustic, electromagnetic and water waves with a single cloaken
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentComputer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentElectrical Engineering Programen
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionAix-Marseille Université, Centrale Marseille- Institut Fresnel, Campus Universitaire de Saint-Jérôme, Marseille, Franceen
kaust.authorFarhat, Mohameden
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