Dynamics of bacterial communities before and after distribution in a full-scale drinking water network

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/564158
Title:
Dynamics of bacterial communities before and after distribution in a full-scale drinking water network
Authors:
El Chakhtoura, Joline; Prest, Emmanuelle I E C; Saikaly, Pascal ( 0000-0001-7678-3986 ) ; van Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.; Hammes, Frederik A.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S. ( 0000-0003-2668-2057 )
Abstract:
Understanding the biological stability of drinking water distribution systems is imperative in the framework of process control and risk management. The objective of this research was to examine the dynamics of the bacterial community during drinking water distribution at high temporal resolution. Water samples (156 in total) were collected over short time-scales (minutes/hours/days) from the outlet of a treatment plant and a location in its corresponding distribution network. The drinking water is treated by biofiltration and disinfectant residuals are absent during distribution. The community was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and flow cytometry as well as conventional, culture-based methods. Despite a random dramatic event (detected with pyrosequencing and flow cytometry but not with plate counts), the bacterial community profile at the two locations did not vary significantly over time. A diverse core microbiome was shared between the two locations (58-65% of the taxa and 86-91% of the sequences) and found to be dependent on the treatment strategy. The bacterial community structure changed during distribution, with greater richness detected in the network and phyla such as Acidobacteria and Gemmatimonadetes becoming abundant. The rare taxa displayed the highest dynamicity, causing the major change during water distribution. This change did not have hygienic implications and is contingent on the sensitivity of the applied methods. The concept of biological stability therefore needs to be revised. Biostability is generally desired in drinking water guidelines but may be difficult to achieve in large-scale complex distribution systems that are inherently dynamic.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Environmental Biotechnology Research Group; Environmental Science and Engineering​​​​​​​​​​
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Water Research
Issue Date:
May-2015
DOI:
10.1016/j.watres.2015.02.015
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00431354
Sponsors:
This research was supported by Evides Waterbedrijf and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) funding. The authors thank Lip-Smacking Design for their artwork services.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEl Chakhtoura, Jolineen
dc.contributor.authorPrest, Emmanuelle I E Cen
dc.contributor.authorSaikaly, Pascalen
dc.contributor.authorvan Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.en
dc.contributor.authorHammes, Frederik A.en
dc.contributor.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T12:34:30Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T12:34:30Zen
dc.date.issued2015-05en
dc.identifier.issn00431354en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2015.02.015en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/564158en
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding the biological stability of drinking water distribution systems is imperative in the framework of process control and risk management. The objective of this research was to examine the dynamics of the bacterial community during drinking water distribution at high temporal resolution. Water samples (156 in total) were collected over short time-scales (minutes/hours/days) from the outlet of a treatment plant and a location in its corresponding distribution network. The drinking water is treated by biofiltration and disinfectant residuals are absent during distribution. The community was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and flow cytometry as well as conventional, culture-based methods. Despite a random dramatic event (detected with pyrosequencing and flow cytometry but not with plate counts), the bacterial community profile at the two locations did not vary significantly over time. A diverse core microbiome was shared between the two locations (58-65% of the taxa and 86-91% of the sequences) and found to be dependent on the treatment strategy. The bacterial community structure changed during distribution, with greater richness detected in the network and phyla such as Acidobacteria and Gemmatimonadetes becoming abundant. The rare taxa displayed the highest dynamicity, causing the major change during water distribution. This change did not have hygienic implications and is contingent on the sensitivity of the applied methods. The concept of biological stability therefore needs to be revised. Biostability is generally desired in drinking water guidelines but may be difficult to achieve in large-scale complex distribution systems that are inherently dynamic.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by Evides Waterbedrijf and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) funding. The authors thank Lip-Smacking Design for their artwork services.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectBacterial communityen
dc.subjectBiological stabilityen
dc.subjectDrinking water distribution systemen
dc.subjectFlow cytometryen
dc.subjectPyrosequencingen
dc.subjectTemporal dynamicsen
dc.titleDynamics of bacterial communities before and after distribution in a full-scale drinking water networken
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Biotechnology Research Groupen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering​​​​​​​​​​en
dc.identifier.journalWater Researchen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67Delft, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionEawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 133Dübendorf, Switzerlanden
dc.contributor.institutionWetsus, European Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology, Oostergoweg 9Leeuwarden, Netherlandsen
kaust.authorSaikaly, Pascalen
kaust.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.en
kaust.authorEl Chakhtoura, Jolineen
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