Changes in physicochemical and transport properties of a reverse osmosis membrane exposed to chloraminated seawater

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/564061
Title:
Changes in physicochemical and transport properties of a reverse osmosis membrane exposed to chloraminated seawater
Authors:
Valentino, Lauren; Renkens, Tennie; Maugin, Thomas; Crouè, Jean-Philippe Philippe; Mariñas, Benito J.
Abstract:
This study contributed to improving our understanding of how disinfectants, applied to control biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes, result in membrane performance degradation. We investigated changes in physicochemical properties and permeation performance of a RO membrane with fully aromatic polyamide (PA) active layer. Membrane samples were exposed to varying concentrations of monochloramine, bromide, and iodide in both synthetic and natural seawater. Elemental analysis of the membrane active layer by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) revealed the incorporation of bromine and iodine into the polyamide. The kinetics of polyamide bromination were first order with respect to the concentration of the secondary oxidizing agent Br2 for the conditions investigated. Halogenated membranes were characterized after treatment with a reducing agent and heavy ion probes to reveal the occurrence of irreversible ring halogenation and an increase in carboxylic groups, the latter produced as a result of amide bond cleavage. Finally, permeation experiments revealed increases in both water permeability and salt passage as a result of oxidative damage.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Environmental Science and Engineering Program
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Journal:
Environmental Science & Technology
Issue Date:
17-Feb-2015
DOI:
10.1021/es504495j
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0013936X
Sponsors:
RBS analyses were carried out in the Center of Microanalysis of Materials, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. We acknowledge Doug Jeffers for assistance operating the RBS. This work was supported by the Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology and the NSF Science and Technology Center for the Purification of Water with Systems (WaterCAMPWS) funded by NSF under agreement CTS-0120978. The opinions of this paper do not necessarily reflect those of the sponsor.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorValentino, Laurenen
dc.contributor.authorRenkens, Tennieen
dc.contributor.authorMaugin, Thomasen
dc.contributor.authorCrouè, Jean-Philippe Philippeen
dc.contributor.authorMariñas, Benito J.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T12:30:21Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T12:30:21Zen
dc.date.issued2015-02-17en
dc.identifier.issn0013936Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/es504495jen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/564061en
dc.description.abstractThis study contributed to improving our understanding of how disinfectants, applied to control biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes, result in membrane performance degradation. We investigated changes in physicochemical properties and permeation performance of a RO membrane with fully aromatic polyamide (PA) active layer. Membrane samples were exposed to varying concentrations of monochloramine, bromide, and iodide in both synthetic and natural seawater. Elemental analysis of the membrane active layer by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) revealed the incorporation of bromine and iodine into the polyamide. The kinetics of polyamide bromination were first order with respect to the concentration of the secondary oxidizing agent Br2 for the conditions investigated. Halogenated membranes were characterized after treatment with a reducing agent and heavy ion probes to reveal the occurrence of irreversible ring halogenation and an increase in carboxylic groups, the latter produced as a result of amide bond cleavage. Finally, permeation experiments revealed increases in both water permeability and salt passage as a result of oxidative damage.en
dc.description.sponsorshipRBS analyses were carried out in the Center of Microanalysis of Materials, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. We acknowledge Doug Jeffers for assistance operating the RBS. This work was supported by the Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology and the NSF Science and Technology Center for the Purification of Water with Systems (WaterCAMPWS) funded by NSF under agreement CTS-0120978. The opinions of this paper do not necessarily reflect those of the sponsor.en
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)en
dc.titleChanges in physicochemical and transport properties of a reverse osmosis membrane exposed to chloraminated seawateren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental Science & Technologyen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Safe Global Water Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUrbana, IL, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionCurtin Water Quality Research Centre, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987Perth, WA, Australiaen
kaust.authorMaugin, Thomasen
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