Squeezing terahertz light into nanovolumes: Nanoantenna enhanced terahertz spectroscopy (NETS) of semiconductor quantum dots

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/564010
Title:
Squeezing terahertz light into nanovolumes: Nanoantenna enhanced terahertz spectroscopy (NETS) of semiconductor quantum dots
Authors:
Toma, Andrea; Tuccio, Salvatore; Prato, Mirko; De Donato, Francesco; Perucchi, Andrea; Di Pietro, Paola; Marras, Sergio; Liberale, Carlo ( 0000-0002-5653-199X ) ; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; De Angelis, Francesco De; Manna, Liberato; Lupi, Stefano; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M. ( 0000-0001-5886-4678 ) ; Razzari, Luca
Abstract:
Terahertz spectroscopy has vast potentialities in sensing a broad range of elementary excitations (e.g., collective vibrations of molecules, phonons, excitons, etc.). However, the large wavelength associated with terahertz radiation (about 300 μm at 1 THz) severely hinders its interaction with nano-objects, such as nanoparticles, nanorods, nanotubes, and large molecules of biological relevance, practically limiting terahertz studies to macroscopic ensembles of these compounds, in the form of thick pellets of crystallized molecules or highly concentrated solutions of nanomaterials. Here we show that chains of terahertz dipole nanoantennas spaced by nanogaps of 20 nm allow retrieving the spectroscopic signature of a monolayer of cadmium selenide quantum dots, a significant portion of the signal arising from the dots located within the antenna nanocavities. A Fano-like interference between the fundamental antenna mode and the phonon resonance of the quantum dots is observed, accompanied by an absorption enhancement factor greater than one million. NETS can find immediate applications in terahertz spectroscopic studies of nanocrystals and molecules at extremely low concentrations. Furthermore, it shows a practicable route toward the characterization of individual nano-objects at these frequencies.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Bioscience Program; Materials Science and Engineering Program; Label-Free Optical Microscopy for Biology Lab
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Journal:
Nano Letters
Issue Date:
14-Jan-2015
DOI:
10.1021/nl503705w
Type:
Article
ISSN:
15306984
Sponsors:
L.R. is grateful for financial support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada and the Fonds de Recherche du Quebec-Nature et technologies (FRQNT).
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Bioscience Program; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Materials Science and Engineering Program; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorToma, Andreaen
dc.contributor.authorTuccio, Salvatoreen
dc.contributor.authorPrato, Mirkoen
dc.contributor.authorDe Donato, Francescoen
dc.contributor.authorPerucchi, Andreaen
dc.contributor.authorDi Pietro, Paolaen
dc.contributor.authorMarras, Sergioen
dc.contributor.authorLiberale, Carloen
dc.contributor.authorProietti Zaccaria, Remoen
dc.contributor.authorDe Angelis, Francesco Deen
dc.contributor.authorManna, Liberatoen
dc.contributor.authorLupi, Stefanoen
dc.contributor.authorDi Fabrizio, Enzo M.en
dc.contributor.authorRazzari, Lucaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T12:22:58Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T12:22:58Zen
dc.date.issued2015-01-14en
dc.identifier.issn15306984en
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/nl503705wen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/564010en
dc.description.abstractTerahertz spectroscopy has vast potentialities in sensing a broad range of elementary excitations (e.g., collective vibrations of molecules, phonons, excitons, etc.). However, the large wavelength associated with terahertz radiation (about 300 μm at 1 THz) severely hinders its interaction with nano-objects, such as nanoparticles, nanorods, nanotubes, and large molecules of biological relevance, practically limiting terahertz studies to macroscopic ensembles of these compounds, in the form of thick pellets of crystallized molecules or highly concentrated solutions of nanomaterials. Here we show that chains of terahertz dipole nanoantennas spaced by nanogaps of 20 nm allow retrieving the spectroscopic signature of a monolayer of cadmium selenide quantum dots, a significant portion of the signal arising from the dots located within the antenna nanocavities. A Fano-like interference between the fundamental antenna mode and the phonon resonance of the quantum dots is observed, accompanied by an absorption enhancement factor greater than one million. NETS can find immediate applications in terahertz spectroscopic studies of nanocrystals and molecules at extremely low concentrations. Furthermore, it shows a practicable route toward the characterization of individual nano-objects at these frequencies.en
dc.description.sponsorshipL.R. is grateful for financial support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada and the Fonds de Recherche du Quebec-Nature et technologies (FRQNT).en
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)en
dc.subjectFano-like interferenceen
dc.subjectnanoantennaen
dc.subjectphonon resonanceen
dc.subjectquantum doten
dc.subjectsurface enhancementen
dc.subjectTerahertz spectroscopyen
dc.titleSqueezing terahertz light into nanovolumes: Nanoantenna enhanced terahertz spectroscopy (NETS) of semiconductor quantum dotsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentBioscience Programen
dc.contributor.departmentMaterials Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentLabel-Free Optical Microscopy for Biology Laben
dc.identifier.journalNano Lettersen
dc.contributor.institutionIstituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30Genova, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionINRS Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650 Blvd Lionel BouletVarennes, QC, Canadaen
dc.contributor.institutionINSTM UdR Trieste-ST and Sincrotrone Trieste, Area Science ParkBasovizza, Trieste, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionCNR-IOM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma la Sapienza, Piazzale A. Moro 2Rome, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionBIONEM Lab., University Magna Graecia, Campus Salvatore Venuta, Viale EuropaGermaneto, Catanzaro, Italyen
kaust.authorLiberale, Carloen
kaust.authorDi Fabrizio, Enzo M.en
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