Twin boundary-assisted lithium-ion transport

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/564008
Title:
Twin boundary-assisted lithium-ion transport
Authors:
Nie, Anmin; Gan, Liyong; Cheng, Yingchun; Li, Qianqian; Yuan, Yifei; Mashayek, Farzad; Wang, Hongtao; Klie, Robert F.; Schwingenschlögl, Udo ( 0000-0003-4179-7231 ) ; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza
Abstract:
With the increased need for high-rate Li-ion batteries, it has become apparent that new electrode materials with enhanced Li-ion transport should be designed. Interfaces, such as twin boundaries (TBs), offer new opportunities to navigate the ionic transport within nanoscale materials. Here, we demonstrate the effects of TBs on the Li-ion transport properties in single crystalline SnO2 nanowires. It is shown that the TB-assisted lithiation pathways are remarkably different from the previously reported lithiation behavior in SnO2 nanowires without TBs. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy study combined with direct atomic-scale imaging of the initial lithiation stage of the TB-SnO2 nanowires prove that the lithium ions prefer to intercalate in the vicinity of the (101¯) TB, which acts as conduit for lithium-ion diffusion inside the nanowires. The density functional theory modeling shows that it is energetically preferred for lithium ions to accumulate near the TB compared to perfect neighboring lattice area. These findings may lead to the design of new electrode materials that incorporate TBs as efficient lithium pathways, and eventually, the development of next generation rechargeable batteries that surpass the rate performance of the current commercial Li-ion batteries.
KAUST Department:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Materials Science and Engineering Program; Computational Physics and Materials Science (CPMS)
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Journal:
Nano Letters
Issue Date:
14-Jan-2015
DOI:
10.1021/nl504087z
Type:
Article
ISSN:
15306984
Sponsors:
R.S.-Y. acknowledges the financial support from the National Science Foundation (Awards No. CMMI-1200383 and DMR-1410560) and the American Chemical Society-Petroleum Research Fund (Award No. 51458-ND10). The acquisition of the UIC JEOL JEM-ARM200CF is supported by an MRI-R<SUP>2</SUP> grant from the National Science Foundation (Grant No. DMR-0959470). Support from the UIC Research Resources Center is also acknowledged. Theoretical simulations reported in this publication were supported by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Materials Science and Engineering Program; Computational Physics and Materials Science (CPMS)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNie, Anminen
dc.contributor.authorGan, Liyongen
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Yingchunen
dc.contributor.authorLi, Qianqianen
dc.contributor.authorYuan, Yifeien
dc.contributor.authorMashayek, Farzaden
dc.contributor.authorWang, Hongtaoen
dc.contributor.authorKlie, Robert F.en
dc.contributor.authorSchwingenschlögl, Udoen
dc.contributor.authorShahbazian-Yassar, Rezaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T12:22:53Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T12:22:53Zen
dc.date.issued2015-01-14en
dc.identifier.issn15306984en
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/nl504087zen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/564008en
dc.description.abstractWith the increased need for high-rate Li-ion batteries, it has become apparent that new electrode materials with enhanced Li-ion transport should be designed. Interfaces, such as twin boundaries (TBs), offer new opportunities to navigate the ionic transport within nanoscale materials. Here, we demonstrate the effects of TBs on the Li-ion transport properties in single crystalline SnO2 nanowires. It is shown that the TB-assisted lithiation pathways are remarkably different from the previously reported lithiation behavior in SnO2 nanowires without TBs. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy study combined with direct atomic-scale imaging of the initial lithiation stage of the TB-SnO2 nanowires prove that the lithium ions prefer to intercalate in the vicinity of the (101¯) TB, which acts as conduit for lithium-ion diffusion inside the nanowires. The density functional theory modeling shows that it is energetically preferred for lithium ions to accumulate near the TB compared to perfect neighboring lattice area. These findings may lead to the design of new electrode materials that incorporate TBs as efficient lithium pathways, and eventually, the development of next generation rechargeable batteries that surpass the rate performance of the current commercial Li-ion batteries.en
dc.description.sponsorshipR.S.-Y. acknowledges the financial support from the National Science Foundation (Awards No. CMMI-1200383 and DMR-1410560) and the American Chemical Society-Petroleum Research Fund (Award No. 51458-ND10). The acquisition of the UIC JEOL JEM-ARM200CF is supported by an MRI-R<SUP>2</SUP> grant from the National Science Foundation (Grant No. DMR-0959470). Support from the UIC Research Resources Center is also acknowledged. Theoretical simulations reported in this publication were supported by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).en
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)en
dc.subjectatomic scaleen
dc.subjectin situ STEMen
dc.subjectlithium-ion transporten
dc.subjecttin oxide nanowiresen
dc.subjectTwin boundaryen
dc.titleTwin boundary-assisted lithium-ion transporten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentMaterials Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentComputational Physics and Materials Science (CPMS)en
dc.identifier.journalNano Lettersen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend DiveHoughton, MI, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Applied Mechanics, Zhejiang UniversityHangzhou, Chinaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Physics, University of Illinois at ChicagoChicago, IL, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionMechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, University of Illinois at ChicagoChicago, IL, United Statesen
kaust.authorGan, Liyongen
kaust.authorCheng, Yingchunen
kaust.authorSchwingenschlögl, Udoen
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