Impact of HSD11B1 polymorphisms on BMI and components of the metabolic syndrome in patients receiving psychotropic treatments

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/563963
Title:
Impact of HSD11B1 polymorphisms on BMI and components of the metabolic syndrome in patients receiving psychotropic treatments
Authors:
Quteineh, Lina; Vandenberghe, Frederik; Saigi Morgui, Nuria; Delacrétaz, Aurélie; Choong, Eva; Gholam-Rezaee, Mehdi; Magistretti, Pierre J. ( 0000-0002-6678-320X ) ; Bondolfi, Guido; Von Gunten, Armin; Preisig, Martin A.; Castelao, Enrique; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Bochud, Murielle; Kutalik, Zoltán; Conus, Philippe O.; Eap, Chin Bin
Abstract:
Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) associated with psychiatric disorders and psychotropic treatments represents a major health issue. 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) is an enzyme that catalyzes tissue regeneration of active cortisol from cortisone. Elevated enzymatic activity of 11β-HSD1 may lead to the development of MetS. Methods We investigated the association between seven HSD11B1 gene (encoding 11β-HSD1) polymorphisms and BMI and MetS components in a psychiatric sample treated with potential weight gain-inducing psychotropic drugs (n=478). The polymorphisms that survived Bonferroni correction were analyzed in two independent psychiatric samples (n R1 =168, n R2 =188) and in several large population-based samples (n 1 =5338; n 2 =123 865; n 3 >100 000). Results HSD11B1 rs846910-A, rs375319-A, and rs4844488-G allele carriers were found to be associated with lower BMI, waist circumference, and diastolic blood pressure compared with the reference genotype (P corrected <0.05). These associations were exclusively detected in women (n=257) with more than 3.1 kg/m 2, 7.5 cm, and 4.2 mmHg lower BMI, waist circumference, and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, in rs846910-A, rs375319-A, and rs4844488-G allele carriers compared with noncarriers (P corrected <0.05). Conversely, carriers of the rs846906-T allele had significantly higher waist circumference and triglycerides and lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol exclusively in men (P corrected =0.028). The rs846906-T allele was also associated with a higher risk of MetS at 3 months of follow-up (odds ratio: 3.31, 95% confidence interval: 1.53-7.17, P corrected =0.014). No association was observed between HSD11B1 polymorphisms and BMI and MetS components in the population-based samples. Conclusions Our results indicate that HSD11B1 polymorphisms may contribute toward the development of MetS in psychiatric patients treated with potential weight gain-inducing psychotropic drugs, but do not play a significant role in the general population. © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Bioscience Program
Publisher:
Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
Journal:
Pharmacogenetics and Genomics
Issue Date:
2015
DOI:
10.1097/FPC.0000000000000131
Type:
Article
ISSN:
17446872
Sponsors:
This work has been funded in part by the Swiss National Research Foundation (CBE and PC: 324730_144064). C.B.E. has received research support from Takeda and from the Roche Organ Transplantation Research Foundation in the past 3 years. M.B. is supported by the Swiss School of Public Health Plus (SSPH+). P.V. and G.W. received an unrestricted grant from GlaxoSmithKline to build the CoLaus study. The CoLaus/PsyCoLaus study received financial contributions from GlaxoSmithKline, the Faculty of Biology and Medicine of Lausanne, the Swiss National Science Foundation (105993, 118308, 122661, 139468). Z.K. received support from the Leenaards Foundation and the Swiss National Science Foundation (31003A-143914).
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Bioscience Program; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorQuteineh, Linaen
dc.contributor.authorVandenberghe, Frederiken
dc.contributor.authorSaigi Morgui, Nuriaen
dc.contributor.authorDelacrétaz, Aurélieen
dc.contributor.authorChoong, Evaen
dc.contributor.authorGholam-Rezaee, Mehdien
dc.contributor.authorMagistretti, Pierre J.en
dc.contributor.authorBondolfi, Guidoen
dc.contributor.authorVon Gunten, Arminen
dc.contributor.authorPreisig, Martin A.en
dc.contributor.authorCastelao, Enriqueen
dc.contributor.authorVollenweider, Peteren
dc.contributor.authorWaeber, Gérarden
dc.contributor.authorBochud, Murielleen
dc.contributor.authorKutalik, Zoltánen
dc.contributor.authorConus, Philippe O.en
dc.contributor.authorEap, Chin Binen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T12:21:04Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T12:21:04Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.issn17446872en
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/FPC.0000000000000131en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/563963en
dc.description.abstractBackground Metabolic syndrome (MetS) associated with psychiatric disorders and psychotropic treatments represents a major health issue. 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) is an enzyme that catalyzes tissue regeneration of active cortisol from cortisone. Elevated enzymatic activity of 11β-HSD1 may lead to the development of MetS. Methods We investigated the association between seven HSD11B1 gene (encoding 11β-HSD1) polymorphisms and BMI and MetS components in a psychiatric sample treated with potential weight gain-inducing psychotropic drugs (n=478). The polymorphisms that survived Bonferroni correction were analyzed in two independent psychiatric samples (n R1 =168, n R2 =188) and in several large population-based samples (n 1 =5338; n 2 =123 865; n 3 >100 000). Results HSD11B1 rs846910-A, rs375319-A, and rs4844488-G allele carriers were found to be associated with lower BMI, waist circumference, and diastolic blood pressure compared with the reference genotype (P corrected <0.05). These associations were exclusively detected in women (n=257) with more than 3.1 kg/m 2, 7.5 cm, and 4.2 mmHg lower BMI, waist circumference, and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, in rs846910-A, rs375319-A, and rs4844488-G allele carriers compared with noncarriers (P corrected <0.05). Conversely, carriers of the rs846906-T allele had significantly higher waist circumference and triglycerides and lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol exclusively in men (P corrected =0.028). The rs846906-T allele was also associated with a higher risk of MetS at 3 months of follow-up (odds ratio: 3.31, 95% confidence interval: 1.53-7.17, P corrected =0.014). No association was observed between HSD11B1 polymorphisms and BMI and MetS components in the population-based samples. Conclusions Our results indicate that HSD11B1 polymorphisms may contribute toward the development of MetS in psychiatric patients treated with potential weight gain-inducing psychotropic drugs, but do not play a significant role in the general population. © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work has been funded in part by the Swiss National Research Foundation (CBE and PC: 324730_144064). C.B.E. has received research support from Takeda and from the Roche Organ Transplantation Research Foundation in the past 3 years. M.B. is supported by the Swiss School of Public Health Plus (SSPH+). P.V. and G.W. received an unrestricted grant from GlaxoSmithKline to build the CoLaus study. The CoLaus/PsyCoLaus study received financial contributions from GlaxoSmithKline, the Faculty of Biology and Medicine of Lausanne, the Swiss National Science Foundation (105993, 118308, 122661, 139468). Z.K. received support from the Leenaards Foundation and the Swiss National Science Foundation (31003A-143914).en
dc.publisherOvid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)en
dc.subjectbody mass indexen
dc.subjectmetabolic syndromeen
dc.subjectpharmacogeneticsen
dc.subjectpsychotropic drugsen
dc.titleImpact of HSD11B1 polymorphisms on BMI and components of the metabolic syndrome in patients receiving psychotropic treatmentsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentBioscience Programen
dc.identifier.journalPharmacogenetics and Genomicsen
dc.contributor.institutionUnit of Pharmacogenetics and Clinical Psychopharmacology, Department of Psychiatry, Lausanne University HospitalPrilly, Switzerlanden
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychiatry, Centre of Psychiatric Epidemiology and Psychopathology, Lausanne University HospitalPrilly, Switzerlanden
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychiatry, Service of Old Age Psychiatry, Lausanne University HospitalPrilly, Switzerlanden
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychiatry, Service of General Psychiatry, Lausanne University HospitalPrilly, Switzerlanden
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory of Neuroenergetics and Cellular Dynamics, Brain Mind Institute, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de LausanneLausanne, Switzerlanden
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of MedicineLausanne, Switzerlanden
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Social and Preventive Medicine (IUMSP), Lausanne University HospitalLausanne, Switzerlanden
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Medical Genetics, University of LausanneLausanne, Switzerlanden
dc.contributor.institutionSwiss Institute of BioinformaticsLausanne, Switzerlanden
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Mental Health and Psychiatry, University Hospital of Geneva, University of LausannePrilly, Lausanne, Switzerlanden
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneve, University of LausannePrilly, Lausanne, Switzerlanden
kaust.authorMagistretti, Pierre J.en
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