Human Health Risk from Metals in Fish from Saudi Arabia: Consumption Patterns for Some Species Exceed Allowable Limits

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/563790
Title:
Human Health Risk from Metals in Fish from Saudi Arabia: Consumption Patterns for Some Species Exceed Allowable Limits
Authors:
Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Mannalamkunnath Alikunhi, Nabeel; Al-Jahdali, Haitham; Al-Jebreen, Dalal Hamad; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz M.; Aziz, Mohammed A M; Batang, Zenon B. ( 0000-0003-4593-0589 )
Abstract:
ABSTRACT: Fish are a healthful source of protein, but contaminants in some fish pose a risk. While there are multiple risk assessments from Europe and North America, there are far fewer for other parts of the world. We examined the risks from mercury, arsenic, lead, and other metals in fish consumed by people in Jeddah area, Saudi Arabia, using site-specific data on consumption patterns and metal levels in fish. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Hazard Quotient (HQ) and cumulative Hazard Index (HI) for non-cancer endpoints and Carcinogenic Index for cancer were used to determine the health risk based on fish consumption rates. Of the 13 fish species examined, HQ was greater than 1 (indicating elevated risk) in two species for arsenic, and seven species for methylmercury. The cumulative HI for all metals was above 1 for all but three species of fish at the mean consumption rates. Generally, fish species with HI above 1 for one sampling location, had HI above 1 for all sampling locations. The implications of these findings are discussed in the light of strategies for reducing risk from fish consumption while encouraging dietary intakes of fish with low mercury and arsenic levels.
KAUST Department:
Coastal and Marine Resources Core Lab
Publisher:
Informa UK Limited
Journal:
Human and Ecological Risk Assessment: An International Journal
Issue Date:
6-Oct-2014
DOI:
10.1080/10807039.2014.934585
Type:
Article
ISSN:
10807039
Sponsors:
This research was funded by the Saudi Arabian Ministry of Agriculture (MoA) to KAUST (KAUST/MoA 228211), with additional funds to Joanna Burger and Michael Gochfeld from EOHSI, NIEHS (P30ES005022), and Rutgers University. The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors, and do not represent the funding agencies.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Coastal and Marine Resources Core Lab

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBurger, Joannaen
dc.contributor.authorGochfeld, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorMannalamkunnath Alikunhi, Nabeelen
dc.contributor.authorAl-Jahdali, Haithamen
dc.contributor.authorAl-Jebreen, Dalal Hamaden
dc.contributor.authorAl-Suwailem, Abdulaziz M.en
dc.contributor.authorAziz, Mohammed A Men
dc.contributor.authorBatang, Zenon B.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T12:10:11Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T12:10:11Zen
dc.date.issued2014-10-06en
dc.identifier.issn10807039en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10807039.2014.934585en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/563790en
dc.description.abstractABSTRACT: Fish are a healthful source of protein, but contaminants in some fish pose a risk. While there are multiple risk assessments from Europe and North America, there are far fewer for other parts of the world. We examined the risks from mercury, arsenic, lead, and other metals in fish consumed by people in Jeddah area, Saudi Arabia, using site-specific data on consumption patterns and metal levels in fish. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Hazard Quotient (HQ) and cumulative Hazard Index (HI) for non-cancer endpoints and Carcinogenic Index for cancer were used to determine the health risk based on fish consumption rates. Of the 13 fish species examined, HQ was greater than 1 (indicating elevated risk) in two species for arsenic, and seven species for methylmercury. The cumulative HI for all metals was above 1 for all but three species of fish at the mean consumption rates. Generally, fish species with HI above 1 for one sampling location, had HI above 1 for all sampling locations. The implications of these findings are discussed in the light of strategies for reducing risk from fish consumption while encouraging dietary intakes of fish with low mercury and arsenic levels.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by the Saudi Arabian Ministry of Agriculture (MoA) to KAUST (KAUST/MoA 228211), with additional funds to Joanna Burger and Michael Gochfeld from EOHSI, NIEHS (P30ES005022), and Rutgers University. The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors, and do not represent the funding agencies.en
dc.publisherInforma UK Limiteden
dc.subjectarsenicen
dc.subjectfish consumptionen
dc.subjecthazard indexen
dc.subjecthazard quotienten
dc.subjecthealth risken
dc.subjectmercuryen
dc.subjectmetalsen
dc.titleHuman Health Risk from Metals in Fish from Saudi Arabia: Consumption Patterns for Some Species Exceed Allowable Limitsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCoastal and Marine Resources Core Laben
dc.identifier.journalHuman and Ecological Risk Assessment: An International Journalen
dc.contributor.institutionDivision of Life Sciences, Rutgers UniversityPiscataway, NJ, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionEnvironmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Rutgers UniversityPiscataway, NJ, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionEnvironmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers–Robert Wood Johnson Medical SchoolPiscataway, NJ, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Nutrition and Food Science, Princess Nora bint Abdul Rahman UniversityRiyadh, Saudi Arabiaen
dc.contributor.institutionDirectorate of Aquatic Environment, Ministry of AgricultureRiyadh, Saudi Arabiaen
kaust.authorAl-Suwailem, Abdulaziz M.en
kaust.authorMannalamkunnath Alikunhi, Nabeelen
kaust.authorAl-Jahdali, Haithamen
kaust.authorBatang, Zenon B.en
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