Combining flow cytometry and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing: A promising approach for drinking water monitoring and characterization

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/563773
Title:
Combining flow cytometry and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing: A promising approach for drinking water monitoring and characterization
Authors:
Prest, Emmanuelle I E C; El Chakhtoura, Joline; Hammes, Frederik A.; Saikaly, Pascal ( 0000-0001-7678-3986 ) ; van Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S. ( 0000-0003-2668-2057 )
Abstract:
The combination of flow cytometry (FCM) and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data was investigated for the purpose of monitoring and characterizing microbial changes in drinking water distribution systems. High frequency sampling (5min intervals for 1h) was performed at the outlet of a treatment plant and at one location in the full-scale distribution network. In total, 52 bulk water samples were analysed with FCM, pyrosequencing and conventional methods (adenosine-triphosphate, ATP; heterotrophic plate count, HPC). FCM and pyrosequencing results individually showed that changes in the microbial community occurred in the water distribution system, which was not detected with conventional monitoring. FCM data showed an increase in the total bacterial cell concentrations (from 345±15×103 to 425±35×103cellsmL-1) and in the percentage of intact bacterial cells (from 39±3.5% to 53±4.4%) during water distribution. This shift was also observed in the FCM fluorescence fingerprints, which are characteristic of each water sample. A similar shift was detected in the microbial community composition as characterized with pyrosequencing, showing that FCM and genetic fingerprints are congruent. FCM and pyrosequencing data were subsequently combined for the calculation of cell concentration changes for each bacterial phylum. The results revealed an increase in cell concentrations of specific bacterial phyla (e.g., Proteobacteria), along with a decrease in other phyla (e.g., Actinobacteria), which could not be concluded from the two methods individually. The combination of FCM and pyrosequencing methods is a promising approach for future drinking water quality monitoring and for advanced studies on drinking water distribution pipeline ecology. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Environmental Biotechnology Research Group; Environmental Science and Engineering​​​​​​​​​​
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Water Research
Issue Date:
Oct-2014
DOI:
10.1016/j.watres.2014.06.020
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00431354
Sponsors:
The studies presented in this article were supported by funds from Evides Waterbedrijf and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology. The authors like to specifically thank Rinnert Schurer, Jan Bahlman and Elodie Loubineaud for their technical support.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPrest, Emmanuelle I E Cen
dc.contributor.authorEl Chakhtoura, Jolineen
dc.contributor.authorHammes, Frederik A.en
dc.contributor.authorSaikaly, Pascalen
dc.contributor.authorvan Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.en
dc.contributor.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T12:09:38Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T12:09:38Zen
dc.date.issued2014-10en
dc.identifier.issn00431354en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2014.06.020en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/563773en
dc.description.abstractThe combination of flow cytometry (FCM) and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data was investigated for the purpose of monitoring and characterizing microbial changes in drinking water distribution systems. High frequency sampling (5min intervals for 1h) was performed at the outlet of a treatment plant and at one location in the full-scale distribution network. In total, 52 bulk water samples were analysed with FCM, pyrosequencing and conventional methods (adenosine-triphosphate, ATP; heterotrophic plate count, HPC). FCM and pyrosequencing results individually showed that changes in the microbial community occurred in the water distribution system, which was not detected with conventional monitoring. FCM data showed an increase in the total bacterial cell concentrations (from 345±15×103 to 425±35×103cellsmL-1) and in the percentage of intact bacterial cells (from 39±3.5% to 53±4.4%) during water distribution. This shift was also observed in the FCM fluorescence fingerprints, which are characteristic of each water sample. A similar shift was detected in the microbial community composition as characterized with pyrosequencing, showing that FCM and genetic fingerprints are congruent. FCM and pyrosequencing data were subsequently combined for the calculation of cell concentration changes for each bacterial phylum. The results revealed an increase in cell concentrations of specific bacterial phyla (e.g., Proteobacteria), along with a decrease in other phyla (e.g., Actinobacteria), which could not be concluded from the two methods individually. The combination of FCM and pyrosequencing methods is a promising approach for future drinking water quality monitoring and for advanced studies on drinking water distribution pipeline ecology. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe studies presented in this article were supported by funds from Evides Waterbedrijf and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology. The authors like to specifically thank Rinnert Schurer, Jan Bahlman and Elodie Loubineaud for their technical support.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subject16S rRNA gene pyrosequencingen
dc.subjectBiological stabilityen
dc.subjectDrinking water quality monitoringen
dc.subjectFlow cytometryen
dc.subjectFluorescence fingerprintsen
dc.subjectTransport networken
dc.titleCombining flow cytometry and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing: A promising approach for drinking water monitoring and characterizationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Biotechnology Research Groupen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering​​​​​​​​​​en
dc.identifier.journalWater Researchen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biotechnology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionEawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 133, CH-8600 Dübendorf, Switzerlanden
dc.contributor.institutionWetsus, Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology, Agora 1, P.O. Box 1113, 8900 CC Leeuwarden, Netherlandsen
kaust.authorSaikaly, Pascalen
kaust.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.en
kaust.authorEl Chakhtoura, Jolineen
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