Experiments and modeling of the autoignition of methylcyclohexane at high pressure

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/563673
Title:
Experiments and modeling of the autoignition of methylcyclohexane at high pressure
Authors:
Weber, Bryan W.; Pitz, William J.; Mehl, Marco; Silke, Emma J.; Davis, Alexander C.; Sung, Chihjen
Abstract:
New experimental data are collected for methyl-cyclohexane (MCH) autoignition in a heated rapid compression machine (RCM). Three mixtures of MCH/O2/N2/Ar at equivalence ratios of φ=0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 are studied and the ignition delays are measured at compressed pressure of 50bar and for compressed temperatures in the range of 690-900K. By keeping the fuel mole fraction in the mixture constant, the order of reactivity, in terms of inverse ignition delay, is measured to be φ=0.5>φ=1.0>φ=1.5, demonstrating the dependence of the ignition delay on oxygen concentration. In addition, an existing model for the combustion of MCH is updated with new reaction rates and pathways, including substantial updates to the low-temperature chemistry. The new model shows good agreement with the overall ignition delays measured in this study, as well as the ignition delays measured previously in the literature using RCMs and shock tubes. This model therefore represents a strong improvement compared to the previous version, which uniformly over-predicted the ignition delays. Chemical kinetic analyses of the updated mechanism are also conducted to help understand the fuel decomposition pathways and the reactions controlling the ignition. Combined, these results and analyses suggest that further investigation of several of the low-temperature fuel decomposition pathways is required. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.
KAUST Department:
Clean Combustion Research Center
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Combustion and Flame
Issue Date:
Aug-2014
DOI:
10.1016/j.combustflame.2014.01.018
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00102180
Sponsors:
The work at the University of Connecticut was supported as part of the Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Award Number DE-SC0001198. The work at LLNL was supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies, program manager Gurpreet Singh and performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344. Alexander Davis acknowledges funding from KAUST CCRC with technical monitoring of Dr. Mani Sarathy.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Clean Combustion Research Center

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWeber, Bryan W.en
dc.contributor.authorPitz, William J.en
dc.contributor.authorMehl, Marcoen
dc.contributor.authorSilke, Emma J.en
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Alexander C.en
dc.contributor.authorSung, Chihjenen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T12:05:48Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T12:05:48Zen
dc.date.issued2014-08en
dc.identifier.issn00102180en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.combustflame.2014.01.018en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/563673en
dc.description.abstractNew experimental data are collected for methyl-cyclohexane (MCH) autoignition in a heated rapid compression machine (RCM). Three mixtures of MCH/O2/N2/Ar at equivalence ratios of φ=0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 are studied and the ignition delays are measured at compressed pressure of 50bar and for compressed temperatures in the range of 690-900K. By keeping the fuel mole fraction in the mixture constant, the order of reactivity, in terms of inverse ignition delay, is measured to be φ=0.5>φ=1.0>φ=1.5, demonstrating the dependence of the ignition delay on oxygen concentration. In addition, an existing model for the combustion of MCH is updated with new reaction rates and pathways, including substantial updates to the low-temperature chemistry. The new model shows good agreement with the overall ignition delays measured in this study, as well as the ignition delays measured previously in the literature using RCMs and shock tubes. This model therefore represents a strong improvement compared to the previous version, which uniformly over-predicted the ignition delays. Chemical kinetic analyses of the updated mechanism are also conducted to help understand the fuel decomposition pathways and the reactions controlling the ignition. Combined, these results and analyses suggest that further investigation of several of the low-temperature fuel decomposition pathways is required. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe work at the University of Connecticut was supported as part of the Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Award Number DE-SC0001198. The work at LLNL was supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies, program manager Gurpreet Singh and performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344. Alexander Davis acknowledges funding from KAUST CCRC with technical monitoring of Dr. Mani Sarathy.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectAutoignitionen
dc.subjectLow-temperature chemistryen
dc.subjectMethylcyclohexaneen
dc.subjectRapid compression machineen
dc.titleExperiments and modeling of the autoignition of methylcyclohexane at high pressureen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentClean Combustion Research Centeren
dc.identifier.journalCombustion and Flameen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionLawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, United Statesen
kaust.authorDavis, Alexander C.en
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