Water crisis: the metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, regional water supply conflict

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/563623
Title:
Water crisis: the metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, regional water supply conflict
Authors:
Missimer, Thomas M.; Danser, Philip Alexander; Amy, Gary L.; Pankratz, Tom M.
Abstract:
Many large population centres are currently facing considerable difficulties with planning issues to secure future water supplies, as a result of water allocation and environmental issues, litigation, and political dogma. A classic case occurs in the metropolitan Atlanta area, which is a rapidly growing, large population centre that relies solely on surface water for supply. Lake Lanier currently supplies about 70% of the water demand and has been involved in a protracted legal dispute for more than two decades. Drought and environmental management of the reservoir combined to create a water shortage which nearly caused a disaster to the region in 2007 (only about 35 days of water supply was in reserve). While the region has made progress in controlling water demand by implementing a conservation plan, per capita use projections are still very high (at 511 L/day in 2035). Both non-potable reuse and indirect reuse of treated wastewater are contained in the most current water supply plan with up to 380,000 m3/day of wastewater treated using advanced wastewater treatment (nutrient removal) to be discharged into Lake Lanier. The water supply plan, however, includes no additional or new supply sources and has deleted any reference to the use of seawater desalination or other potential water sources which would provide diversification, thereby relying solely on the Coosa and Chattahoochee river reservoirs for the future. © 2014 IWA Publishing.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Water Desalination & Reuse Research Cntr; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Publisher:
IWA Publishing
Journal:
Water Policy
Issue Date:
Jul-2014
DOI:
10.2166/wp.2014.131
Type:
Article
ISSN:
13667017
Sponsors:
This research was funded by the Water Desalination and Reuse Center and from discretionary research funds provided by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMissimer, Thomas M.en
dc.contributor.authorDanser, Philip Alexanderen
dc.contributor.authorAmy, Gary L.en
dc.contributor.authorPankratz, Tom M.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T12:04:40Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T12:04:40Zen
dc.date.issued2014-07en
dc.identifier.issn13667017en
dc.identifier.doi10.2166/wp.2014.131en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/563623en
dc.description.abstractMany large population centres are currently facing considerable difficulties with planning issues to secure future water supplies, as a result of water allocation and environmental issues, litigation, and political dogma. A classic case occurs in the metropolitan Atlanta area, which is a rapidly growing, large population centre that relies solely on surface water for supply. Lake Lanier currently supplies about 70% of the water demand and has been involved in a protracted legal dispute for more than two decades. Drought and environmental management of the reservoir combined to create a water shortage which nearly caused a disaster to the region in 2007 (only about 35 days of water supply was in reserve). While the region has made progress in controlling water demand by implementing a conservation plan, per capita use projections are still very high (at 511 L/day in 2035). Both non-potable reuse and indirect reuse of treated wastewater are contained in the most current water supply plan with up to 380,000 m3/day of wastewater treated using advanced wastewater treatment (nutrient removal) to be discharged into Lake Lanier. The water supply plan, however, includes no additional or new supply sources and has deleted any reference to the use of seawater desalination or other potential water sources which would provide diversification, thereby relying solely on the Coosa and Chattahoochee river reservoirs for the future. © 2014 IWA Publishing.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by the Water Desalination and Reuse Center and from discretionary research funds provided by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia.en
dc.publisherIWA Publishingen
dc.subjectReservoir managementen
dc.subjectWater disputeen
dc.subjectWater litigationen
dc.subjectWater reuseen
dc.subjectWater supply managementen
dc.subjectWater supply planningen
dc.titleWater crisis: the metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, regional water supply conflicten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination & Reuse Research Cntren
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalWater Policyen
dc.contributor.institutionWater Desalination Report, P.O. Box 75064, Houston, TX 77234-5064, United Statesen
kaust.authorMissimer, Thomas M.en
kaust.authorAmy, Gary L.en
kaust.authorDanser, Philip Alexanderen
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