Biomass changes and trophic amplification of plankton in a warmer ocean

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/563540
Title:
Biomass changes and trophic amplification of plankton in a warmer ocean
Authors:
Chust, Guillem; Allen, Julian Icarus; Bopp, Laurent; Schrum, Corinna; Holt, Jason T.; Tsiaras, Kostas P.; Zavatarelli, Marco; Chifflet, Marina; Cannaby, Heather; Dadou, Isabelle C.; Daewel, Ute; Wakelin, Sarah L.; Machú, Eric; Pushpadas, Dhanya; Butenschön, Momme; Artioli, Yuri; Petihakis, George; Smith, Chris J M; Garçon, Véronique C.; Goubanova, Katerina; Le Vu, Briac; Fach, Bettina A.; Salihoglu, Baris; Clementi, Emanuela; Irigoien, Xabier ( 0000-0002-5411-6741 )
Abstract:
Ocean warming can modify the ecophysiology and distribution of marine organisms, and relationships between species, with nonlinear interactions between ecosystem components potentially resulting in trophic amplification. Trophic amplification (or attenuation) describe the propagation of a hydroclimatic signal up the food web, causing magnification (or depression) of biomass values along one or more trophic pathways. We have employed 3-D coupled physical-biogeochemical models to explore ecosystem responses to climate change with a focus on trophic amplification. The response of phytoplankton and zooplankton to global climate-change projections, carried out with the IPSL Earth System Model by the end of the century, is analysed at global and regional basis, including European seas (NE Atlantic, Barents Sea, Baltic Sea, Black Sea, Bay of Biscay, Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea) and the Eastern Boundary Upwelling System (Benguela). Results indicate that globally and in Atlantic Margin and North Sea, increased ocean stratification causes primary production and zooplankton biomass to decrease in response to a warming climate, whilst in the Barents, Baltic and Black Seas, primary production and zooplankton biomass increase. Projected warming characterized by an increase in sea surface temperature of 2.29 ± 0.05 °C leads to a reduction in zooplankton and phytoplankton biomasses of 11% and 6%, respectively. This suggests negative amplification of climate driven modifications of trophic level biomass through bottom-up control, leading to a reduced capacity of oceans to regulate climate through the biological carbon pump. Simulations suggest negative amplification is the dominant response across 47% of the ocean surface and prevails in the tropical oceans; whilst positive trophic amplification prevails in the Arctic and Antarctic oceans. Trophic attenuation is projected in temperate seas. Uncertainties in ocean plankton projections, associated to the use of single global and regional models, imply the need for caution when extending these considerations into higher trophic levels. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Marine Science Program; Plankton ecology Research Group
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Global Change Biology
Issue Date:
7-May-2014
DOI:
10.1111/gcb.12562
PubMed ID:
24604761
Type:
Article
ISSN:
13541013
Sponsors:
This research was funded by the European Commission (Contract no. 212085, MEECE: Marine Ecosystem Evolution in a Changing Environment, and Contract no. 264933, EURO-BASIN: European Union Basin-scale Analysis, Synthesis and Integration). We also thank the three anonymous reviewers for their careful assessment of our manuscript. This is contribution 665 from AZTI-Tecnalia Marine Research Division.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Marine Science Program; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChust, Guillemen
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Julian Icarusen
dc.contributor.authorBopp, Laurenten
dc.contributor.authorSchrum, Corinnaen
dc.contributor.authorHolt, Jason T.en
dc.contributor.authorTsiaras, Kostas P.en
dc.contributor.authorZavatarelli, Marcoen
dc.contributor.authorChifflet, Marinaen
dc.contributor.authorCannaby, Heatheren
dc.contributor.authorDadou, Isabelle C.en
dc.contributor.authorDaewel, Uteen
dc.contributor.authorWakelin, Sarah L.en
dc.contributor.authorMachú, Ericen
dc.contributor.authorPushpadas, Dhanyaen
dc.contributor.authorButenschön, Mommeen
dc.contributor.authorArtioli, Yurien
dc.contributor.authorPetihakis, Georgeen
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Chris J Men
dc.contributor.authorGarçon, Véronique C.en
dc.contributor.authorGoubanova, Katerinaen
dc.contributor.authorLe Vu, Briacen
dc.contributor.authorFach, Bettina A.en
dc.contributor.authorSalihoglu, Barisen
dc.contributor.authorClementi, Emanuelaen
dc.contributor.authorIrigoien, Xabieren
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:54:00Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:54:00Zen
dc.date.issued2014-05-07en
dc.identifier.issn13541013en
dc.identifier.pmid24604761en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/gcb.12562en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/563540en
dc.description.abstractOcean warming can modify the ecophysiology and distribution of marine organisms, and relationships between species, with nonlinear interactions between ecosystem components potentially resulting in trophic amplification. Trophic amplification (or attenuation) describe the propagation of a hydroclimatic signal up the food web, causing magnification (or depression) of biomass values along one or more trophic pathways. We have employed 3-D coupled physical-biogeochemical models to explore ecosystem responses to climate change with a focus on trophic amplification. The response of phytoplankton and zooplankton to global climate-change projections, carried out with the IPSL Earth System Model by the end of the century, is analysed at global and regional basis, including European seas (NE Atlantic, Barents Sea, Baltic Sea, Black Sea, Bay of Biscay, Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea) and the Eastern Boundary Upwelling System (Benguela). Results indicate that globally and in Atlantic Margin and North Sea, increased ocean stratification causes primary production and zooplankton biomass to decrease in response to a warming climate, whilst in the Barents, Baltic and Black Seas, primary production and zooplankton biomass increase. Projected warming characterized by an increase in sea surface temperature of 2.29 ± 0.05 °C leads to a reduction in zooplankton and phytoplankton biomasses of 11% and 6%, respectively. This suggests negative amplification of climate driven modifications of trophic level biomass through bottom-up control, leading to a reduced capacity of oceans to regulate climate through the biological carbon pump. Simulations suggest negative amplification is the dominant response across 47% of the ocean surface and prevails in the tropical oceans; whilst positive trophic amplification prevails in the Arctic and Antarctic oceans. Trophic attenuation is projected in temperate seas. Uncertainties in ocean plankton projections, associated to the use of single global and regional models, imply the need for caution when extending these considerations into higher trophic levels. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by the European Commission (Contract no. 212085, MEECE: Marine Ecosystem Evolution in a Changing Environment, and Contract no. 264933, EURO-BASIN: European Union Basin-scale Analysis, Synthesis and Integration). We also thank the three anonymous reviewers for their careful assessment of our manuscript. This is contribution 665 from AZTI-Tecnalia Marine Research Division.en
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.subjectEcosystem modelen
dc.subjectFood weben
dc.subjectPlanktonen
dc.subjectPrimary productionen
dc.subjectSea warmingen
dc.subjectTrophic amplificationen
dc.titleBiomass changes and trophic amplification of plankton in a warmer oceanen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Programen
dc.contributor.departmentPlankton ecology Research Groupen
dc.identifier.journalGlobal Change Biologyen
dc.contributor.institutionAZTI Tecnalia, Div Marine Res, Pasaia 20110, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionPML, Plymouth PL1 3DH, Devon, Englanden
dc.contributor.institutionIPSL, LSCE, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniv Bergen GFI UIB, Inst Geophys, N-5007 Bergen, Norwayen
dc.contributor.institutionNatl Oceanog Ctr, Liverpool L3 5DA, Merseyside, Englanden
dc.contributor.institutionHCMR, Mavro Lithari 19013, Anavyssos, Greeceen
dc.contributor.institutionAlma Mater Studiorum Univ Bologna, Dipartimento Fis & Astron, I-40127 Bologna, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionAlma Mater Studiorum Univ Bologna Sede Ravenna, Ctr Interdipartimentale Ric Sci Ambientali, I-48123 Ravenna, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionMETU, Inst Marine Sci, TR-33731 Erdemli Mersin, Turkeyen
dc.contributor.institutionUPS, CNRS, CNES, LEGOS,IRD,OMP,UMR5566, F-31400 Toulouse, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionNansen Environm & Remote Sensing Ctr, N-5006 Bergen, Norwayen
dc.contributor.institutionUBO, IRD, IFREMER, CNRS,Lab Phys Oceans,UMR6523, F-29280 Plouzane, Franceen
kaust.authorIrigoien, Xabieren

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