One-dimensional self-confinement promotes polymorph selection in large-area organic semiconductor thin films

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/563500
Title:
One-dimensional self-confinement promotes polymorph selection in large-area organic semiconductor thin films
Authors:
Giri, Gaurav; Li, Ruipeng; Smilgies, Detlef Matthias; Li, Erqiang ( 0000-0002-5003-0756 ) ; Diao, Ying; Lenn, Kristina M.; Chiu, Melanie; Lin, Debora W.; Allen, Ranulfo A.; Reinspach, Julia A.; Mannsfeld, Stefan C B; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T. ( 0000-0001-6997-4311 ) ; Clancy, Paulette; Bao, Zhenan; Amassian, Aram ( 0000-0002-5734-1194 )
Abstract:
A crystal's structure has significant impact on its resulting biological, physical, optical and electronic properties. In organic electronics, 6,13(bis-triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS-pentacene), a small-molecule organic semiconductor, adopts metastable polymorphs possessing significantly faster charge transport than the equilibrium crystal when deposited using the solution-shearing method. Here, we use a combination of high-speed polarized optical microscopy, in situ microbeam grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray-scattering and molecular simulations to understand the mechanism behind formation of metastable TIPS-pentacene polymorphs. We observe that thin-film crystallization occurs first at the air-solution interface, and nanoscale vertical spatial confinement of the solution results in formation of metastable polymorphs, a one-dimensional and large-area analogy to crystallization of polymorphs in nanoporous matrices. We demonstrate that metastable polymorphism can be tuned with unprecedented control and produced over large areas by either varying physical confinement conditions or by tuning energetic conditions during crystallization through use of solvent molecules of various sizes. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.
KAUST Department:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Solar and Photovoltaic Engineering Research Center (SPERC); Mechanical Engineering Program; Materials Science and Engineering Program; High-Speed Fluids Imaging Laboratory; Organic Electronics and Photovoltaics Group
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Journal:
Nature Communications
Issue Date:
16-Apr-2014
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms4573
Type:
Article
ISSN:
20411723
Sponsors:
This work was partially supported by the National Science Foundation (DMR-1303178), the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-12-1-0190), and an Intel Foundation/SRCEA Masters Scholarship (for K.M.L.) supported in part by the Office of Competitive Research Funding (OCRF) of the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) under CRG and AEA awards. CHESS is supported by the NSF and NIH/NIGMS via NSF award DMR-0936384. Y.D. and S.C.B. M. acknowledge the support from Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD). We acknowledge travel support from the KAUST sponsored Stanford Center for Advanced Photovoltaics. We thank Dr Jeffery Tok for helpful reading and corrections of the manuscript. E.Q.L. is grateful for a SABIC Postdoctoral Fellowship.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Materials Science and Engineering Program; Mechanical Engineering Program; Solar and Photovoltaic Engineering Research Center (SPERC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGiri, Gauraven
dc.contributor.authorLi, Ruipengen
dc.contributor.authorSmilgies, Detlef Matthiasen
dc.contributor.authorLi, Erqiangen
dc.contributor.authorDiao, Yingen
dc.contributor.authorLenn, Kristina M.en
dc.contributor.authorChiu, Melanieen
dc.contributor.authorLin, Debora W.en
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Ranulfo A.en
dc.contributor.authorReinspach, Julia A.en
dc.contributor.authorMannsfeld, Stefan C Ben
dc.contributor.authorThoroddsen, Sigurdur T.en
dc.contributor.authorClancy, Pauletteen
dc.contributor.authorBao, Zhenanen
dc.contributor.authorAmassian, Aramen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:52:59Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:52:59Zen
dc.date.issued2014-04-16en
dc.identifier.issn20411723en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms4573en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/563500en
dc.description.abstractA crystal's structure has significant impact on its resulting biological, physical, optical and electronic properties. In organic electronics, 6,13(bis-triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS-pentacene), a small-molecule organic semiconductor, adopts metastable polymorphs possessing significantly faster charge transport than the equilibrium crystal when deposited using the solution-shearing method. Here, we use a combination of high-speed polarized optical microscopy, in situ microbeam grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray-scattering and molecular simulations to understand the mechanism behind formation of metastable TIPS-pentacene polymorphs. We observe that thin-film crystallization occurs first at the air-solution interface, and nanoscale vertical spatial confinement of the solution results in formation of metastable polymorphs, a one-dimensional and large-area analogy to crystallization of polymorphs in nanoporous matrices. We demonstrate that metastable polymorphism can be tuned with unprecedented control and produced over large areas by either varying physical confinement conditions or by tuning energetic conditions during crystallization through use of solvent molecules of various sizes. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was partially supported by the National Science Foundation (DMR-1303178), the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-12-1-0190), and an Intel Foundation/SRCEA Masters Scholarship (for K.M.L.) supported in part by the Office of Competitive Research Funding (OCRF) of the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) under CRG and AEA awards. CHESS is supported by the NSF and NIH/NIGMS via NSF award DMR-0936384. Y.D. and S.C.B. M. acknowledge the support from Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD). We acknowledge travel support from the KAUST sponsored Stanford Center for Advanced Photovoltaics. We thank Dr Jeffery Tok for helpful reading and corrections of the manuscript. E.Q.L. is grateful for a SABIC Postdoctoral Fellowship.en
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.titleOne-dimensional self-confinement promotes polymorph selection in large-area organic semiconductor thin filmsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentSolar and Photovoltaic Engineering Research Center (SPERC)en
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentMaterials Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentHigh-Speed Fluids Imaging Laboratoryen
dc.contributor.departmentOrganic Electronics and Photovoltaics Groupen
dc.identifier.journalNature Communicationsen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionCornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Ithaca, New York 14853, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionSLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025, United Statesen
kaust.authorLi, Ruipengen
kaust.authorLi, Erqiangen
kaust.authorThoroddsen, Sigurdur T.en
kaust.authorAmassian, Aramen
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