Role of primary substrate composition on microbial community structure and function and trace organic chemical attenuation in managed aquifer recharge systems

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/563458
Title:
Role of primary substrate composition on microbial community structure and function and trace organic chemical attenuation in managed aquifer recharge systems
Authors:
Li, Dong; Alidina, Mazahirali; Drewes, Jorg
Abstract:
This study was performed to reveal the microbial community characteristics in simulated managed aquifer recharge (MAR), a natural water treatment system, under different concentrations and compositions of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and further link these to the biotransformation of emerging trace organic chemicals (TOrCs). Two pairs of soil-column setups were established in the laboratory receiving synthetic feed solutions composed of different peptone/humic acid ratios and concentrations. Higher BDOC concentration resulted in lower microbial community diversity and higher relative abundance of Betaproteobacteria. Decreasing the peptone/humic acid ratio resulted in higher diversity of the community and higher relative abundances of Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, and Actinobacteria. The metabolic capabilities of microbiome involved in xenobiotics biodegradation were significantly promoted under lower BDOC concentration and higher humic acid content. Cytochrome P450 genes were also more abundant under these primary substrate conditions. Lower peptone/humic acid ratios also promoted the attenuation of most TOrCs. These results suggest that the primary substrate characterized by a more refractory character could increase the relative abundances of Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, and Actinobacteria, as well as associated cytochrome P450 genes, all of which should play important roles in the biotransformation of TOrCs in this natural treatment system. © 2014 Springer-Verlag.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Water Desalination & Reuse Research Cntr
Publisher:
Springer Science + Business Media
Journal:
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
Issue Date:
26-Mar-2014
DOI:
10.1007/s00253-014-5677-8
Type:
Article
ISSN:
01757598
Sponsors:
This research was supported by discretionary investigator funds at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). The material presented is also based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Cooperative Agreement EEC-1028968. The authors are thankful for technical assistance provided by Prof. Pascal Saikaly at KAUST as well as Prof. Jonathan O. Sharp at Colorado School of Mines.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLi, Dongen
dc.contributor.authorAlidina, Mazahiralien
dc.contributor.authorDrewes, Jorgen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:52:00Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:52:00Zen
dc.date.issued2014-03-26en
dc.identifier.issn01757598en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00253-014-5677-8en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/563458en
dc.description.abstractThis study was performed to reveal the microbial community characteristics in simulated managed aquifer recharge (MAR), a natural water treatment system, under different concentrations and compositions of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and further link these to the biotransformation of emerging trace organic chemicals (TOrCs). Two pairs of soil-column setups were established in the laboratory receiving synthetic feed solutions composed of different peptone/humic acid ratios and concentrations. Higher BDOC concentration resulted in lower microbial community diversity and higher relative abundance of Betaproteobacteria. Decreasing the peptone/humic acid ratio resulted in higher diversity of the community and higher relative abundances of Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, and Actinobacteria. The metabolic capabilities of microbiome involved in xenobiotics biodegradation were significantly promoted under lower BDOC concentration and higher humic acid content. Cytochrome P450 genes were also more abundant under these primary substrate conditions. Lower peptone/humic acid ratios also promoted the attenuation of most TOrCs. These results suggest that the primary substrate characterized by a more refractory character could increase the relative abundances of Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, and Actinobacteria, as well as associated cytochrome P450 genes, all of which should play important roles in the biotransformation of TOrCs in this natural treatment system. © 2014 Springer-Verlag.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by discretionary investigator funds at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). The material presented is also based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Cooperative Agreement EEC-1028968. The authors are thankful for technical assistance provided by Prof. Pascal Saikaly at KAUST as well as Prof. Jonathan O. Sharp at Colorado School of Mines.en
dc.publisherSpringer Science + Business Mediaen
dc.subjectBiodegradable dissolved organic carbonen
dc.subjectCytochrome p450en
dc.subjectEmerging trace organic chemicalsen
dc.subjectManaged aquifer rechargeen
dc.subjectMetagenomicsen
dc.titleRole of primary substrate composition on microbial community structure and function and trace organic chemical attenuation in managed aquifer recharge systemsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination & Reuse Research Cntren
dc.identifier.journalApplied Microbiology and Biotechnologyen
dc.contributor.institutionNSF Engineering Research Center ReNUWIt, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionUrban Water Systems Engineering, Technische Universität München, Am Coulombwall 8, 85748 Garching, Germanyen
kaust.authorLi, Dongen
kaust.authorAlidina, Mazahiralien
kaust.authorDrewes, Jorgen
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