In situ and real-time atomic force microscopy studies of the stability of oligothiophene langmuir-blodgett monolayers in liquid

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/563447
Title:
In situ and real-time atomic force microscopy studies of the stability of oligothiophene langmuir-blodgett monolayers in liquid
Authors:
Yin, Naining; Buyanin, Alexander A.; Riechers, Shawn L.; Lee, Olivia P.; Frechet, Jean ( 0000-0001-6419-0163 ) ; Salmerón, Miquel B.; Liu, Gangyu
Abstract:
Oligothiophene thin films have been considered as promising material for molecular electronics due to their desirable electronic properties and high structural stability under ambient conditions. To ensure performance in devices the functional structures, such as individual ordered domains, must be stable under practical and operational conditions or environments including exposure to various media. This work investigates the structure of oligothiophene Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films upon exposure to liquid media such as water, ethanol (EtOH), and mixed tetrahydrofuran (THF)/EtOH solutions. The LB films form islands ranging from 500 nm up to 1 μm consisting of densely packed oligothiophene molecules. These islands are surrounded by bare substrate and loosely packed adsorbates. In situ and time-dependent AFM images were acquired to reveal the structural evolution, from which degradation pathways and kinetics are extracted. Degradation of these LB films initiates and propagates from intraisland defect sites, such as cracks and pin holes, whereas the edges of islands remain intact on the surface. The observations appear to be in contrast to the known degradation mechanism among self-assembled monolayers, such as alkanethiols on gold, which initiates and progresses at domain boundaries. Rationale for the observed degradation processes will also be discussed. © 2014 American Chemical Society.
KAUST Department:
Chemical Science Program; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Journal:
The Journal of Physical Chemistry C
Issue Date:
20-Mar-2014
DOI:
10.1021/jp410767h
Type:
Article
ISSN:
19327447
Sponsors:
We appreciate many helpful discussions with Drs. G. Yang, M. Zhang, N. Schore, and Mr. A. Hicklin at the University of California, Davis; Dr. W. Miller at Sacramento City College; and Mr. Y. Zhang at the University of California, Berkeley. This work was supported by NSF (CHE-0809977 and DMR-1104260), the University of California, Davis and Berkeley, and the Betty and Gordon Moore Foundation.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Chemical Science Program

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorYin, Nainingen
dc.contributor.authorBuyanin, Alexander A.en
dc.contributor.authorRiechers, Shawn L.en
dc.contributor.authorLee, Olivia P.en
dc.contributor.authorFrechet, Jeanen
dc.contributor.authorSalmerón, Miquel B.en
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Gangyuen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:51:42Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:51:42Zen
dc.date.issued2014-03-20en
dc.identifier.issn19327447en
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/jp410767hen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/563447en
dc.description.abstractOligothiophene thin films have been considered as promising material for molecular electronics due to their desirable electronic properties and high structural stability under ambient conditions. To ensure performance in devices the functional structures, such as individual ordered domains, must be stable under practical and operational conditions or environments including exposure to various media. This work investigates the structure of oligothiophene Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films upon exposure to liquid media such as water, ethanol (EtOH), and mixed tetrahydrofuran (THF)/EtOH solutions. The LB films form islands ranging from 500 nm up to 1 μm consisting of densely packed oligothiophene molecules. These islands are surrounded by bare substrate and loosely packed adsorbates. In situ and time-dependent AFM images were acquired to reveal the structural evolution, from which degradation pathways and kinetics are extracted. Degradation of these LB films initiates and propagates from intraisland defect sites, such as cracks and pin holes, whereas the edges of islands remain intact on the surface. The observations appear to be in contrast to the known degradation mechanism among self-assembled monolayers, such as alkanethiols on gold, which initiates and progresses at domain boundaries. Rationale for the observed degradation processes will also be discussed. © 2014 American Chemical Society.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe appreciate many helpful discussions with Drs. G. Yang, M. Zhang, N. Schore, and Mr. A. Hicklin at the University of California, Davis; Dr. W. Miller at Sacramento City College; and Mr. Y. Zhang at the University of California, Berkeley. This work was supported by NSF (CHE-0809977 and DMR-1104260), the University of California, Davis and Berkeley, and the Betty and Gordon Moore Foundation.en
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)en
dc.titleIn situ and real-time atomic force microscopy studies of the stability of oligothiophene langmuir-blodgett monolayers in liquiden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentChemical Science Programen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Physical Chemistry Cen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionMaterials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionMaterials Science and Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, United Statesen
kaust.authorFrechet, Jeanen
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