Investigating the gas sorption mechanism in an rht -metal-organic framework through computational studies

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/563336
Title:
Investigating the gas sorption mechanism in an rht -metal-organic framework through computational studies
Authors:
Pham, Tony T.; Forrest, Katherine A.; Eckert, Juergen; Georgiev, Peter A L; Mullen, Ashley L.; Luebke, Ryan ( 0000-0002-1285-3321 ) ; Cairns, Amy; Belmabkhout, Youssef ( 0000-0001-9952-5007 ) ; Eubank, Jarrod F.; McLaughlin, Keith; Lohstroh, Wiebke; Eddaoudi, Mohamed ( 0000-0003-1916-9837 ) ; Space, Brian
Abstract:
Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were performed to investigate CO2 and H2 sorption in an rht-metal-organic framework (MOF) that was synthesized with a ligand having a nitrogen-rich trigonal core through trisubstituted triazine groups and amine functional groups. This MOF was synthesized by two different groups, each reporting their own distinct gas sorption measurements and crystal structure. Electronic structure calculations demonstrated that the small differences in the atomic positions between each group's crystal structure resulted in different electrostatic parameters about the Cu2+ ions for the respective unit cells. Simulations of CO2 sorption were performed with and without many-body polarization effects and using our recently developed CO2 potentials, in addition to a well-known bulk CO2 model, in both crystallographic unit cells. Simulated CO2 sorption isotherms and calculated isosteric heats of adsorption, Qst, values were in excellent agreement with the results reported previously by Eddaoudi et al. for both structures using the polarizable CO2 potential. For both crystal structures, the initial site for CO2 sorption were the Cu 2+ ions that had the higher positive charge in the unit cell, although the identity of this electropositive Cu2+ ion was different in each case. Simulations of H2 sorption were performed with three different hydrogen potentials of increasing anisotropy in both crystal structures and the results, especially with the highest fidelity model, agreed well with Eddaoudi et al.'s experimental data. The preferred site of H 2 sorption at low loading was between two Cu2+ ions of neighboring paddlewheels. The calculation of the normalized hydrogen dipole distribution for the polarizable model in both crystal structures aided in the identification of four distinct sorption sites in the MOF, which is consistent to what was observed in the experimental inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra. Lastly, while the experimental results for the two groups are quantitatively different, the sorption mechanisms (for both crystal structures and sorbates) are broadly similar and not inconsistent with either set of experimental data; the theoretical sorption isotherms themselves resemble those by Eddaoudi et al. © 2013 American Chemical Society.
KAUST Department:
Advanced Membranes and Porous Materials Research Center; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Chemical Science Program; Functional Materials Design, Discovery and Development (FMD3)
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Journal:
The Journal of Physical Chemistry C
Issue Date:
9-Jan-2014
DOI:
10.1021/jp409950r
Type:
Article
ISSN:
19327447
Sponsors:
This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (Award No. CHE-1152362). Computations were performed under a XSEDE Grant (No. TG-DMR090028) to B.S. This publication is also based on work supported by Award No. FIC/2010/06, made by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). The authors also thank the Space Foundation (Basic and Applied Research) for partial support. B.S. would like to acknowledge the use of the services provided by Research Computing at the University of South Florida. In addition, this work is based in part on experiments performed on the TOFTOF instrument operated by FRM-II at the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), Garching, Germany. P.A.G acknowledges support from the Project "Beyond Everest." under EU Programme REGPOT-2011-1. Lastly, the authors thank Professor Randy W. Larsen and his research group for interactive discussions on this project.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Advanced Membranes and Porous Materials Research Center; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Functional Materials Design, Discovery and Development (FMD3); Chemical Science Program

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPham, Tony T.en
dc.contributor.authorForrest, Katherine A.en
dc.contributor.authorEckert, Juergenen
dc.contributor.authorGeorgiev, Peter A Len
dc.contributor.authorMullen, Ashley L.en
dc.contributor.authorLuebke, Ryanen
dc.contributor.authorCairns, Amyen
dc.contributor.authorBelmabkhout, Youssefen
dc.contributor.authorEubank, Jarrod F.en
dc.contributor.authorMcLaughlin, Keithen
dc.contributor.authorLohstroh, Wiebkeen
dc.contributor.authorEddaoudi, Mohameden
dc.contributor.authorSpace, Brianen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:46:04Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:46:04Zen
dc.date.issued2014-01-09en
dc.identifier.issn19327447en
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/jp409950ren
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/563336en
dc.description.abstractGrand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were performed to investigate CO2 and H2 sorption in an rht-metal-organic framework (MOF) that was synthesized with a ligand having a nitrogen-rich trigonal core through trisubstituted triazine groups and amine functional groups. This MOF was synthesized by two different groups, each reporting their own distinct gas sorption measurements and crystal structure. Electronic structure calculations demonstrated that the small differences in the atomic positions between each group's crystal structure resulted in different electrostatic parameters about the Cu2+ ions for the respective unit cells. Simulations of CO2 sorption were performed with and without many-body polarization effects and using our recently developed CO2 potentials, in addition to a well-known bulk CO2 model, in both crystallographic unit cells. Simulated CO2 sorption isotherms and calculated isosteric heats of adsorption, Qst, values were in excellent agreement with the results reported previously by Eddaoudi et al. for both structures using the polarizable CO2 potential. For both crystal structures, the initial site for CO2 sorption were the Cu 2+ ions that had the higher positive charge in the unit cell, although the identity of this electropositive Cu2+ ion was different in each case. Simulations of H2 sorption were performed with three different hydrogen potentials of increasing anisotropy in both crystal structures and the results, especially with the highest fidelity model, agreed well with Eddaoudi et al.'s experimental data. The preferred site of H 2 sorption at low loading was between two Cu2+ ions of neighboring paddlewheels. The calculation of the normalized hydrogen dipole distribution for the polarizable model in both crystal structures aided in the identification of four distinct sorption sites in the MOF, which is consistent to what was observed in the experimental inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra. Lastly, while the experimental results for the two groups are quantitatively different, the sorption mechanisms (for both crystal structures and sorbates) are broadly similar and not inconsistent with either set of experimental data; the theoretical sorption isotherms themselves resemble those by Eddaoudi et al. © 2013 American Chemical Society.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the National Science Foundation (Award No. CHE-1152362). Computations were performed under a XSEDE Grant (No. TG-DMR090028) to B.S. This publication is also based on work supported by Award No. FIC/2010/06, made by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). The authors also thank the Space Foundation (Basic and Applied Research) for partial support. B.S. would like to acknowledge the use of the services provided by Research Computing at the University of South Florida. In addition, this work is based in part on experiments performed on the TOFTOF instrument operated by FRM-II at the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), Garching, Germany. P.A.G acknowledges support from the Project "Beyond Everest." under EU Programme REGPOT-2011-1. Lastly, the authors thank Professor Randy W. Larsen and his research group for interactive discussions on this project.en
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)en
dc.titleInvestigating the gas sorption mechanism in an rht -metal-organic framework through computational studiesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentAdvanced Membranes and Porous Materials Research Centeren
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentChemical Science Programen
dc.contributor.departmentFunctional Materials Design, Discovery and Development (FMD3)en
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Physical Chemistry Cen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemistry, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Avenue, CHE205, Tampa, FL 33620-5250, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Structural Chemistry, University of Milan, 21 Via G. Venezian, I-20133 Milan, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Sofia, 1 James Bourchier Blvd., Sofia 1164, Bulgariaen
dc.contributor.institutionHeinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstraße 1, D-85748 Garching, Germanyen
kaust.authorLuebke, Ryanen
kaust.authorCairns, Amyen
kaust.authorBelmabkhout, Youssefen
kaust.authorEddaoudi, Mohameden
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