Osmotically driven membrane process for the management of urban runoff in coastal regions

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/563300
Title:
Osmotically driven membrane process for the management of urban runoff in coastal regions
Authors:
Li, Zhenyu; Valladares Linares, Rodrigo ( 0000-0003-3790-3249 ) ; Abu-Ghdaib, Muhannad; Zhan, Tong; Yangali-Quintanilla, Victor; Amy, Gary L.
Abstract:
An osmotic detention pond was proposed for the management of urban runoff in coastal regions. Forward osmosis was employed as a bridge to utilize natural osmotic energy from seawater for concentrating and reusing urban runoff water, and as a barrier to reject runoff-derived contaminants. The process was demonstrated by a lab scale testing using synthetic urban runoff (as the feed solution) and synthetic seawater (as the draw solution). The submerged forward osmosis process was conducted under neutral, acidic and natural organic matter fouling condition, respectively. Forward osmosis flux decline was mainly attributed to the dilution of seawater during a semi-batch process in lab scale testing. However, it is possible to minimize flux decrease by maintaining a constant salinity at the draw solution side. Various changes in urban runoff water quality, including acidic conditions (acid rain) and natural organic matter presence, did not show significant effects on the rejection of trace metals and phosphorus, but influenced salt leakage and the rejection of nitrate and total nitrogen. Rejection of trace metals varied from 98% to 100%, phosphorus varied from 97% to 100, nitrate varied from 52% to 94% and total nitrogen varied from 65% to 85% under different feed water conditions. The work described in this study contributes to an integrated system of urban runoff management, seawater desalination and possible power generation in coastal regions to achieve a sustainable solution to the water-energy nexus. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Water Research
Issue Date:
Jan-2014
DOI:
10.1016/j.watres.2013.09.028
PubMed ID:
24099852
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00431354
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLi, Zhenyuen
dc.contributor.authorValladares Linares, Rodrigoen
dc.contributor.authorAbu-Ghdaib, Muhannaden
dc.contributor.authorZhan, Tongen
dc.contributor.authorYangali-Quintanilla, Victoren
dc.contributor.authorAmy, Gary L.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:45:12Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:45:12Zen
dc.date.issued2014-01en
dc.identifier.issn00431354en
dc.identifier.pmid24099852en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2013.09.028en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/563300en
dc.description.abstractAn osmotic detention pond was proposed for the management of urban runoff in coastal regions. Forward osmosis was employed as a bridge to utilize natural osmotic energy from seawater for concentrating and reusing urban runoff water, and as a barrier to reject runoff-derived contaminants. The process was demonstrated by a lab scale testing using synthetic urban runoff (as the feed solution) and synthetic seawater (as the draw solution). The submerged forward osmosis process was conducted under neutral, acidic and natural organic matter fouling condition, respectively. Forward osmosis flux decline was mainly attributed to the dilution of seawater during a semi-batch process in lab scale testing. However, it is possible to minimize flux decrease by maintaining a constant salinity at the draw solution side. Various changes in urban runoff water quality, including acidic conditions (acid rain) and natural organic matter presence, did not show significant effects on the rejection of trace metals and phosphorus, but influenced salt leakage and the rejection of nitrate and total nitrogen. Rejection of trace metals varied from 98% to 100%, phosphorus varied from 97% to 100, nitrate varied from 52% to 94% and total nitrogen varied from 65% to 85% under different feed water conditions. The work described in this study contributes to an integrated system of urban runoff management, seawater desalination and possible power generation in coastal regions to achieve a sustainable solution to the water-energy nexus. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectCoastal regionsen
dc.subjectDesalinationen
dc.subjectForward osmosisen
dc.subjectSustainabilityen
dc.subjectUrban runoffen
dc.subjectWater reuseen
dc.titleOsmotically driven membrane process for the management of urban runoff in coastal regionsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Centeren
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalWater Researchen
kaust.authorLi, Zhenyuen
kaust.authorValladares Linares, Rodrigoen
kaust.authorZhan, Tongen
kaust.authorYangali-Quintanilla, Victoren
kaust.authorAmy, Gary L.en
kaust.authorAbu-Ghdaib, Muhannaden

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