Hot-electron nanoscopy using adiabatic compression of surface plasmons

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/563045
Title:
Hot-electron nanoscopy using adiabatic compression of surface plasmons
Authors:
Giugni, Andrea; Torre, Bruno; Toma, Andrea; Francardi, Marco; Malerba, Mario; Alabastri, Alessandro; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Stockman, Mark Mark; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M. ( 0000-0001-5886-4678 )
Abstract:
Surface plasmon polaritons are a central concept in nanoplasmonics and have been exploited to develop ultrasensitive chemical detection platforms, as well as imaging and spectroscopic techniques at the nanoscale. Surface plasmons can decay to form highly energetic (or hot) electrons in a process that is usually thought to be parasitic for applications, because it limits the lifetime and propagation length of surface plasmons and therefore has an adverse influence on the functionality of nanoplasmonic devices. Recently, however, it has been shown that hot electrons produced by surface plasmon decay can be harnessed to produce useful work in photodetection, catalysis and solar energy conversion. Nevertheless, the surface-plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency has been below 1% in all cases. Here we show that adiabatic focusing of surface plasmons on a Schottky diode-terminated tapered tip of nanoscale dimensions allows for a plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency of ∼30%. We further demonstrate that, with such high efficiency, hot electrons can be used for a new nanoscopy technique based on an atomic force microscopy set-up. We show that this hot-electron nanoscopy preserves the chemical sensitivity of the scanned surface and has a spatial resolution below 50 nm, with margins for improvement.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Materials Science and Engineering Program
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Nature Nanotechnology
Issue Date:
20-Oct-2013
DOI:
10.1038/nnano.2013.207
Type:
Article
ISSN:
17483387
Sponsors:
The authors thank M. Lorenzoni for providing the patterned sample for hot-electron nanoimaging. The authors also thank S. Lupi for infrared absorption measurements, B. S. Ooi for helping with 980 nm measurements, and A. Fratalocchi for several useful discussions. E. D. F. acknowledges support from European Projects Nanoantenna (FP7 No. 241818, FOCUS FP7 No. 270483). M. I. S. acknowledges support from the Max Planck Society and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Cluster of Excellence: Munich Center for Advanced Photonics (http://www.munich-photonics.de) and the Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences Division (grant no. DE-FG02-01ER15213) of the Materials Sciences and Engineering Division of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Department of Energy (grant no. DE-FG02-11ER46789).
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Materials Science and Engineering Program; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGiugni, Andreaen
dc.contributor.authorTorre, Brunoen
dc.contributor.authorToma, Andreaen
dc.contributor.authorFrancardi, Marcoen
dc.contributor.authorMalerba, Marioen
dc.contributor.authorAlabastri, Alessandroen
dc.contributor.authorProietti Zaccaria, Remoen
dc.contributor.authorStockman, Mark Marken
dc.contributor.authorDi Fabrizio, Enzo M.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:34:30Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:34:30Zen
dc.date.issued2013-10-20en
dc.identifier.issn17483387en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/nnano.2013.207en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/563045en
dc.description.abstractSurface plasmon polaritons are a central concept in nanoplasmonics and have been exploited to develop ultrasensitive chemical detection platforms, as well as imaging and spectroscopic techniques at the nanoscale. Surface plasmons can decay to form highly energetic (or hot) electrons in a process that is usually thought to be parasitic for applications, because it limits the lifetime and propagation length of surface plasmons and therefore has an adverse influence on the functionality of nanoplasmonic devices. Recently, however, it has been shown that hot electrons produced by surface plasmon decay can be harnessed to produce useful work in photodetection, catalysis and solar energy conversion. Nevertheless, the surface-plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency has been below 1% in all cases. Here we show that adiabatic focusing of surface plasmons on a Schottky diode-terminated tapered tip of nanoscale dimensions allows for a plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency of ∼30%. We further demonstrate that, with such high efficiency, hot electrons can be used for a new nanoscopy technique based on an atomic force microscopy set-up. We show that this hot-electron nanoscopy preserves the chemical sensitivity of the scanned surface and has a spatial resolution below 50 nm, with margins for improvement.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors thank M. Lorenzoni for providing the patterned sample for hot-electron nanoimaging. The authors also thank S. Lupi for infrared absorption measurements, B. S. Ooi for helping with 980 nm measurements, and A. Fratalocchi for several useful discussions. E. D. F. acknowledges support from European Projects Nanoantenna (FP7 No. 241818, FOCUS FP7 No. 270483). M. I. S. acknowledges support from the Max Planck Society and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Cluster of Excellence: Munich Center for Advanced Photonics (http://www.munich-photonics.de) and the Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences Division (grant no. DE-FG02-01ER15213) of the Materials Sciences and Engineering Division of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Department of Energy (grant no. DE-FG02-11ER46789).en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.titleHot-electron nanoscopy using adiabatic compression of surface plasmonsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentMaterials Science and Engineering Programen
dc.identifier.journalNature Nanotechnologyen
dc.contributor.institutionNanostructures, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, 16163 Genova, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionNanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionBIONEM, Bio-Nanotechnology and Engineering for Medicine, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Magna Graecia Viale Europa, Germaneto, 88100 Catanzaro, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionMax-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching, Germanyen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Physics, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30340, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionFakultät für Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, D-80539 München, Germanyen
kaust.authorGiugni, Andreaen
kaust.authorTorre, Brunoen
kaust.authorFrancardi, Marcoen
kaust.authorDi Fabrizio, Enzo M.en
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