Semi-transparent polymer solar cells with excellent sub-bandgap transmission for third generation photovoltaics

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/563037
Title:
Semi-transparent polymer solar cells with excellent sub-bandgap transmission for third generation photovoltaics
Authors:
Beiley, Zach M.; Christoforo, Mark Greyson; Gratia, Paul; Bowring, Andrea R.; Eberspacher, Petra; Margulis, George Y.; Cabanetos, Clement; Beaujuge, Pierre; Salleo, Alberto; McGehee, Michael D.
Abstract:
Semi-transparent organic photovoltaics are of interest for a variety of photovoltaic applications, including solar windows and hybrid tandem photovoltaics. The figure shows a photograph of our semi-transparent solar cell, which has a power conversion efficiency of 5.0%, with an above bandgap transmission of 34% and a sub-bandgap transmission of 81%. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
KAUST Department:
Solar and Photovoltaic Engineering Research Center (SPERC); Chemical Science Program; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Advanced Materials
Issue Date:
7-Oct-2013
DOI:
10.1002/adma.201301985
PubMed ID:
24123497
Type:
Article
ISSN:
09359648
Sponsors:
This research was based upon work supported by the Department of Energy through the Bay Area Photovoltaic Consortium under Award Number DE-EE0004946, and by the Center for Advanced Molecular Photovoltaics (CAMP) (Award no. KUS-C1-015-21) made by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). Work was performed in part at the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility's nSiL lab, which was funded by National Science Foundation (award ARI-0963061). Additional funding was provided by the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship (Z.M.B.), the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (A.R.B.), Baseline Research Funding from KAUST (P.M.B.), and the TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy. Thanks to Rommel Noufi at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for providing the CIGS cell used as the bottom cell of the hybrid tandem devices.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Chemical Science Program; Solar and Photovoltaic Engineering Research Center (SPERC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBeiley, Zach M.en
dc.contributor.authorChristoforo, Mark Greysonen
dc.contributor.authorGratia, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorBowring, Andrea R.en
dc.contributor.authorEberspacher, Petraen
dc.contributor.authorMargulis, George Y.en
dc.contributor.authorCabanetos, Clementen
dc.contributor.authorBeaujuge, Pierreen
dc.contributor.authorSalleo, Albertoen
dc.contributor.authorMcGehee, Michael D.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:34:18Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:34:18Zen
dc.date.issued2013-10-07en
dc.identifier.issn09359648en
dc.identifier.pmid24123497en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/adma.201301985en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/563037en
dc.description.abstractSemi-transparent organic photovoltaics are of interest for a variety of photovoltaic applications, including solar windows and hybrid tandem photovoltaics. The figure shows a photograph of our semi-transparent solar cell, which has a power conversion efficiency of 5.0%, with an above bandgap transmission of 34% and a sub-bandgap transmission of 81%. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was based upon work supported by the Department of Energy through the Bay Area Photovoltaic Consortium under Award Number DE-EE0004946, and by the Center for Advanced Molecular Photovoltaics (CAMP) (Award no. KUS-C1-015-21) made by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). Work was performed in part at the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility's nSiL lab, which was funded by National Science Foundation (award ARI-0963061). Additional funding was provided by the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship (Z.M.B.), the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (A.R.B.), Baseline Research Funding from KAUST (P.M.B.), and the TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy. Thanks to Rommel Noufi at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for providing the CIGS cell used as the bottom cell of the hybrid tandem devices.en
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.subjecthybrid tandem photovoltaicen
dc.subjectorganic photovoltaicen
dc.subjectsemi-transparenten
dc.subjectsilver nanowireen
dc.subjectsolar cellen
dc.titleSemi-transparent polymer solar cells with excellent sub-bandgap transmission for third generation photovoltaicsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSolar and Photovoltaic Engineering Research Center (SPERC)en
dc.contributor.departmentChemical Science Programen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalAdvanced Materialsen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 476 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, United Statesen
kaust.authorCabanetos, Clementen
kaust.authorBeaujuge, Pierreen

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