Solvent additive effects on small molecule crystallization in bulk heterojunction solar cells probed during spin casting

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562970
Title:
Solvent additive effects on small molecule crystallization in bulk heterojunction solar cells probed during spin casting
Authors:
Pérez, Louis A.; Chou, Kang Wei; Love, John A.; Van Der Poll, Thomas S.; Smilgies, Detlef Matthias; Nguyen, Thuc Quyen; Krämer, Edward J.; Amassian, Aram ( 0000-0002-5734-1194 ) ; Bazan, Guillermo C.
Abstract:
Solvent additive processing can lead to drastic improvements in the power conversion efficiency (PCE) in solution processable small molecule (SPSM) bulk heterojunction solar cells. In situ grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering is used to investigate the kinetics of crystallite formation during and shortly after spin casting. The additive is shown to have a complex effect on structural evolution invoking polymorphism and enhanced crystalline quality of the donor SPSM. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
KAUST Department:
Materials Science and Engineering Program; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Solar and Photovoltaic Engineering Research Center (SPERC); Organic Electronics and Photovoltaics Group
Publisher:
Wiley-VCH Verlag
Journal:
Advanced Materials
Issue Date:
4-Sep-2013
DOI:
10.1002/adma.201302389; 10.1002/adma.201370275
PubMed ID:
24002890
Type:
Article
ISSN:
09359648
Sponsors:
This work was supported as part of the Center for Energy Efficient Materials, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award DC0001009 and by the Office of Collaborative Research Funds of the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology under the FIC and CRG programs. L.A.P. acknowledges support from the ConvEne IGERT Program (NSF-DGE 0801627) and a Graduate Research Fellowship from the National Science Foundation (GRFP). The time-resolved synchrotron work was conducted at beamline D1 at the Cornell High-Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), which is supported by the US National Science Foundation and the US National Institutes of Health/National Institute of General Medical Sciences under NSF award DMR-0936384. Portions of this research were carried out at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, a Directorate of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and an Office of Science User Facility operated for the US Department of Energy Office of Science by Stanford University. T.Q.N. thanks the Camille Dreyfus Teacher Scholar Award and the Alfred Sloan Research Fellowship program.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Materials Science and Engineering Program; Solar and Photovoltaic Engineering Research Center (SPERC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPérez, Louis A.en
dc.contributor.authorChou, Kang Weien
dc.contributor.authorLove, John A.en
dc.contributor.authorVan Der Poll, Thomas S.en
dc.contributor.authorSmilgies, Detlef Matthiasen
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Thuc Quyenen
dc.contributor.authorKrämer, Edward J.en
dc.contributor.authorAmassian, Aramen
dc.contributor.authorBazan, Guillermo C.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:17:29Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:17:29Zen
dc.date.issued2013-09-04en
dc.identifier.issn09359648en
dc.identifier.pmid24002890en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/adma.201302389en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/adma.201370275en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562970en
dc.description.abstractSolvent additive processing can lead to drastic improvements in the power conversion efficiency (PCE) in solution processable small molecule (SPSM) bulk heterojunction solar cells. In situ grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering is used to investigate the kinetics of crystallite formation during and shortly after spin casting. The additive is shown to have a complex effect on structural evolution invoking polymorphism and enhanced crystalline quality of the donor SPSM. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported as part of the Center for Energy Efficient Materials, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award DC0001009 and by the Office of Collaborative Research Funds of the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology under the FIC and CRG programs. L.A.P. acknowledges support from the ConvEne IGERT Program (NSF-DGE 0801627) and a Graduate Research Fellowship from the National Science Foundation (GRFP). The time-resolved synchrotron work was conducted at beamline D1 at the Cornell High-Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), which is supported by the US National Science Foundation and the US National Institutes of Health/National Institute of General Medical Sciences under NSF award DMR-0936384. Portions of this research were carried out at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, a Directorate of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and an Office of Science User Facility operated for the US Department of Energy Office of Science by Stanford University. T.Q.N. thanks the Camille Dreyfus Teacher Scholar Award and the Alfred Sloan Research Fellowship program.en
dc.publisherWiley-VCH Verlagen
dc.subjectbulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cellsen
dc.subjectorganic photovoltaics (OPV)en
dc.subjectsolution processable small moleculesen
dc.subjectsolvent additive processingen
dc.subjectthin film morphologyen
dc.titleSolvent additive effects on small molecule crystallization in bulk heterojunction solar cells probed during spin castingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMaterials Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentSolar and Photovoltaic Engineering Research Center (SPERC)en
dc.contributor.departmentOrganic Electronics and Photovoltaics Groupen
dc.identifier.journalAdvanced Materialsen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara CA 93106, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Barbara CA 93106, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara CA 93106, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionCornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca NY 14850, United Statesen
kaust.authorChou, Kang Weien
kaust.authorAmassian, Aramen

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