Sustainable design of high-performance microsized microbial fuel cell with carbon nanotube anode and air cathode

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562919
Title:
Sustainable design of high-performance microsized microbial fuel cell with carbon nanotube anode and air cathode
Authors:
Mink, Justine E.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa ( 0000-0003-3279-0441 )
Abstract:
Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising alternative energy source that both generates electricity and cleans water. Fueled by liquid wastes such as wastewater or industrial wastes, the microbial fuel cell converts waste into energy. Microsized MFCs are essentially miniature energy harvesters that can be used to power on-chip electronics, lab-on-a-chip devices, and/or sensors. As MFCs are a relatively new technology, microsized MFCs are also an important rapid testing platform for the comparison and introduction of new conditions or materials into macroscale MFCs, especially nanoscale materials that have high potential for enhanced power production. Here we report a 75 μL microsized MFC on silicon using CMOS-compatible processes and employ a novel nanomaterial with exceptional electrochemical properties, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), as the on-chip anode. We used this device to compare the usage of the more commonly used but highly expensive anode material gold, as well as a more inexpensive substitute, nickel. This is the first anode material study done using the most sustainably designed microsized MFC to date, which utilizes ambient oxygen as the electron acceptor with an air cathode instead of the chemical ferricyanide and without a membrane. Ferricyanide is unsustainable, as the chemical must be continuously refilled, while using oxygen, naturally found in air, makes the device mobile and is a key step in commercializing this for portable technology such as lab-on-a-chip for point-of-care diagnostics. At 880 mA/m2 and 19 mW/m2 the MWCNT anode outperformed the others in both current and power densities with between 6 and 20 times better performance. All devices were run for over 15 days, indicating a stable and high-endurance energy harvester already capable of producing enough power for ultra-low-power electronics and able to consistently power them over time. © 2013 American Chemical Society.
KAUST Department:
Integrated Nanotechnology Lab; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division; Electrical Engineering Program; Environmental Science and Engineering Program
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Journal:
ACS Nano
Issue Date:
27-Aug-2013
DOI:
10.1021/nn402103q
PubMed ID:
23899322
Type:
Article
ISSN:
19360851
Sponsors:
We would like to thank Professor Bruce Logan at Penn State University for useful discussions, Professor Gary Amy at KAUST for laboratory use at the Water Desalination and Reuse Center, Jhonathan Prieto Rojas and Rami Qaisi for fabrication assistance, and Mariyam Mahmoud and Shaiza Sin ha from the MUST schools for photographs. This work has been possible with the generous Baseline Research Funding provided by KAUST and GRP Collaborative Fellow (GRP-CF-2011-03-S) grant for J.E.M.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Electrical Engineering Program; Integrated Nanotechnology Lab; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMink, Justine E.en
dc.contributor.authorHussain, Muhammad Mustafaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:15:29Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:15:29Zen
dc.date.issued2013-08-27en
dc.identifier.issn19360851en
dc.identifier.pmid23899322en
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/nn402103qen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562919en
dc.description.abstractMicrobial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising alternative energy source that both generates electricity and cleans water. Fueled by liquid wastes such as wastewater or industrial wastes, the microbial fuel cell converts waste into energy. Microsized MFCs are essentially miniature energy harvesters that can be used to power on-chip electronics, lab-on-a-chip devices, and/or sensors. As MFCs are a relatively new technology, microsized MFCs are also an important rapid testing platform for the comparison and introduction of new conditions or materials into macroscale MFCs, especially nanoscale materials that have high potential for enhanced power production. Here we report a 75 μL microsized MFC on silicon using CMOS-compatible processes and employ a novel nanomaterial with exceptional electrochemical properties, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), as the on-chip anode. We used this device to compare the usage of the more commonly used but highly expensive anode material gold, as well as a more inexpensive substitute, nickel. This is the first anode material study done using the most sustainably designed microsized MFC to date, which utilizes ambient oxygen as the electron acceptor with an air cathode instead of the chemical ferricyanide and without a membrane. Ferricyanide is unsustainable, as the chemical must be continuously refilled, while using oxygen, naturally found in air, makes the device mobile and is a key step in commercializing this for portable technology such as lab-on-a-chip for point-of-care diagnostics. At 880 mA/m2 and 19 mW/m2 the MWCNT anode outperformed the others in both current and power densities with between 6 and 20 times better performance. All devices were run for over 15 days, indicating a stable and high-endurance energy harvester already capable of producing enough power for ultra-low-power electronics and able to consistently power them over time. © 2013 American Chemical Society.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe would like to thank Professor Bruce Logan at Penn State University for useful discussions, Professor Gary Amy at KAUST for laboratory use at the Water Desalination and Reuse Center, Jhonathan Prieto Rojas and Rami Qaisi for fabrication assistance, and Mariyam Mahmoud and Shaiza Sin ha from the MUST schools for photographs. This work has been possible with the generous Baseline Research Funding provided by KAUST and GRP Collaborative Fellow (GRP-CF-2011-03-S) grant for J.E.M.en
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)en
dc.subjectcarbon nanotubesen
dc.subjectelectrolyteen
dc.subjectmicrobial fuel cell (MFC)en
dc.subjectnanotechnologyen
dc.subjectsilicon chipen
dc.titleSustainable design of high-performance microsized microbial fuel cell with carbon nanotube anode and air cathodeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentIntegrated Nanotechnology Laben
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentComputer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentElectrical Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.identifier.journalACS Nanoen
kaust.authorMink, Justine E.en
kaust.authorHussain, Muhammad Mustafaen
All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.