Effects of ambient oxygen concentration on biodiesel and diesel spray combustion under simulated engine conditions

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562886
Title:
Effects of ambient oxygen concentration on biodiesel and diesel spray combustion under simulated engine conditions
Authors:
Zhang, Ji; Jing, Wei; Roberts, William L. ( 0000-0003-1999-2831 ) ; Fang, Tiegang
Abstract:
This study investigates the effect of ambient oxygen concentration on biodiesel and diesel spray combustion under simulated compression-ignition engine conditions in a constant-volume chamber. The apparent heat release rate (AHRR) is calculated based on the measured pressure. High-speed imaging of OH* chemiluminescence and natural luminosity (NL) is employed to visualize the combustion process. Temporally and spatially resolved NL and OH* contour plots are obtained. The result indicates that AHRR depends monotonically on the ambient oxygen concentration for both fuels. A lower oxygen concentration yields a slower AHRR increase rate, a lower peak AHRR value, but a higher AHRR value during the burn-out stage when compared with higher ambient oxygen concentration conditions. OH* chemiluminescence and NL contours indicate that biodiesel may experience a longer premixed-combustion duration. The 18% ambient O2 condition works better for biodiesel than diesel in reducing soot luminosity. With 12% O2, diesel combustion is significantly degraded. However, both fuels experience low temperature combustion at 10% O2. These results may imply that biodiesel is able to achieve the desired lower soot production under a moderate oxygen level with higher combustion efficiency, while diesel needs to be burned under very low ambient oxygen concentration for low soot production. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.
KAUST Department:
Clean Combustion Research Center; Mechanical Engineering Program; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Energy
Issue Date:
Aug-2013
DOI:
10.1016/j.energy.2013.05.063
Type:
Article
ISSN:
03605442
Sponsors:
This research was supported in part by the Faculty Research and Professional Development (FRPD) Fund from the North Carolina State University and by the Natural Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-0854174. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the funding agencies.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Mechanical Engineering Program; Clean Combustion Research Center

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jien
dc.contributor.authorJing, Weien
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, William L.en
dc.contributor.authorFang, Tiegangen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:14:08Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:14:08Zen
dc.date.issued2013-08en
dc.identifier.issn03605442en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.energy.2013.05.063en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562886en
dc.description.abstractThis study investigates the effect of ambient oxygen concentration on biodiesel and diesel spray combustion under simulated compression-ignition engine conditions in a constant-volume chamber. The apparent heat release rate (AHRR) is calculated based on the measured pressure. High-speed imaging of OH* chemiluminescence and natural luminosity (NL) is employed to visualize the combustion process. Temporally and spatially resolved NL and OH* contour plots are obtained. The result indicates that AHRR depends monotonically on the ambient oxygen concentration for both fuels. A lower oxygen concentration yields a slower AHRR increase rate, a lower peak AHRR value, but a higher AHRR value during the burn-out stage when compared with higher ambient oxygen concentration conditions. OH* chemiluminescence and NL contours indicate that biodiesel may experience a longer premixed-combustion duration. The 18% ambient O2 condition works better for biodiesel than diesel in reducing soot luminosity. With 12% O2, diesel combustion is significantly degraded. However, both fuels experience low temperature combustion at 10% O2. These results may imply that biodiesel is able to achieve the desired lower soot production under a moderate oxygen level with higher combustion efficiency, while diesel needs to be burned under very low ambient oxygen concentration for low soot production. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported in part by the Faculty Research and Professional Development (FRPD) Fund from the North Carolina State University and by the Natural Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-0854174. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the funding agencies.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectBiodieselen
dc.subjectChemiluminescenceen
dc.subjectConstant-volume chamberen
dc.subjectDieselen
dc.subjectLuminosityen
dc.subjectSpray combustionen
dc.titleEffects of ambient oxygen concentration on biodiesel and diesel spray combustion under simulated engine conditionsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentClean Combustion Research Centeren
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalEnergyen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, United Statesen
kaust.authorRoberts, William L.en
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