Subsurface intakes for seawater reverse osmosis facilities: Capacity limitation, water quality improvement, and economics

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562879
Title:
Subsurface intakes for seawater reverse osmosis facilities: Capacity limitation, water quality improvement, and economics
Authors:
Missimer, Thomas M.; Ghaffour, Noreddine ( 0000-0003-2095-4736 ) ; Dehwah, Abdullah; Rachman, Rinaldi; Maliva,, Robert G.; Amy, Gary L.
Abstract:
The use of subsurface intake systems for seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) desalination plants significantly improves raw water quality, reduces chemical usage and environmental impacts, decreases the carbon footprint, and reduces cost of treated water to consumers. These intakes include wells (vertical, angle, and radial type) and galleries, which can be located either on the beach or in the seabed. Subsurface intakes act both as intakes and as part of the pretreatment system by providing filtration and active biological treatment of the raw seawater. Recent investigations of the improvement in water quality made by subsurface intakes show lowering of the silt density index by 75 to 90%, removal of nearly all algae, removal of over 90% of bacteria, reduction in the concentrations of TOC and DOC, and virtual elimination of biopolymers and polysaccharides that cause organic biofouling of membranes. Economic analyses show that overall SWRO operating costs can be reduced by 5 to 30% by using subsurface intake systems. Although capital costs can be slightly to significantly higher compared to open-ocean intake system costs, a preliminary life-cycle cost analysis shows significant cost saving over operating periods of 10 to 30. years. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Water Desalination & Reuse Research Cntr; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Environmental Science and Engineering Program
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Desalination
Issue Date:
Aug-2013
DOI:
10.1016/j.desal.2013.04.021
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00119164
Sponsors:
Research funding for this paper was provided by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology and the Water Desalination and Reuse Center. Many of the text figures were drafted by Gina Lipor.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMissimer, Thomas M.en
dc.contributor.authorGhaffour, Noreddineen
dc.contributor.authorDehwah, Abdullahen
dc.contributor.authorRachman, Rinaldien
dc.contributor.authorMaliva,, Robert G.en
dc.contributor.authorAmy, Gary L.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:13:51Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:13:51Zen
dc.date.issued2013-08en
dc.identifier.issn00119164en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.desal.2013.04.021en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562879en
dc.description.abstractThe use of subsurface intake systems for seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) desalination plants significantly improves raw water quality, reduces chemical usage and environmental impacts, decreases the carbon footprint, and reduces cost of treated water to consumers. These intakes include wells (vertical, angle, and radial type) and galleries, which can be located either on the beach or in the seabed. Subsurface intakes act both as intakes and as part of the pretreatment system by providing filtration and active biological treatment of the raw seawater. Recent investigations of the improvement in water quality made by subsurface intakes show lowering of the silt density index by 75 to 90%, removal of nearly all algae, removal of over 90% of bacteria, reduction in the concentrations of TOC and DOC, and virtual elimination of biopolymers and polysaccharides that cause organic biofouling of membranes. Economic analyses show that overall SWRO operating costs can be reduced by 5 to 30% by using subsurface intake systems. Although capital costs can be slightly to significantly higher compared to open-ocean intake system costs, a preliminary life-cycle cost analysis shows significant cost saving over operating periods of 10 to 30. years. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.en
dc.description.sponsorshipResearch funding for this paper was provided by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology and the Water Desalination and Reuse Center. Many of the text figures were drafted by Gina Lipor.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectBiofoulingen
dc.subjectCost of desalinationen
dc.subjectFeedwater quality improvementen
dc.subjectSeawater reverse osmosisen
dc.subjectSubsurface intake systemsen
dc.titleSubsurface intakes for seawater reverse osmosis facilities: Capacity limitation, water quality improvement, and economicsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination & Reuse Research Cntren
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.identifier.journalDesalinationen
dc.contributor.institutionSchlumberger Water Services, 1567 Hayley Lane, Suite 202, Fort Myers, FL 33907, United Statesen
kaust.authorMissimer, Thomas M.en
kaust.authorGhaffour, Noreddineen
kaust.authorDehwah, Abdullahen
kaust.authorRachman, Rinaldien
kaust.authorAmy, Gary L.en
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