Fate of bulk organic matter, nitrogen, and pharmaceutically active compounds in batch experiments simulating soil aquifer treatment (SAT) using primary effluent

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562827
Title:
Fate of bulk organic matter, nitrogen, and pharmaceutically active compounds in batch experiments simulating soil aquifer treatment (SAT) using primary effluent
Authors:
Abel, Chol D T; Sharma, Saroj K.; Maeng, Sungkyu; Magic-Knezev, Aleksandra; Kennedy, Maria Dolores; Amy, Gary L.
Abstract:
Reduction of bulk organic matter, nitrogen, and pharmaceutically active compounds from primary effluent during managed aquifer recharge was investigated using laboratory-scale batch reactors. Biologically stable batch reactors were spiked with different concentrations of sodium azide to inhibit biological activity and probe the effect of microbial activity on attenuation of various pollutants of concern. The experimental results obtained revealed that removal of dissolved organic carbon correlated with active microbial biomass. Furthermore, addition of 2 mM of sodium azide affected nitrite-oxidizing bacteria leading to accumulation of nitrite-nitrogen in the reactors while an ammonium-nitrogen reduction of 95.5 % was achieved. Removal efficiencies of the hydrophilic neutral compounds phenacetin, paracetamol, and caffeine were independent of the extent of the active microbial biomass and were >90 % in all reactors, whereas removal of pentoxifylline was dependent on the biological stability of the reactor. However, hydrophobic ionic compounds exhibited removal efficiency >80 % in batch reactors with the highest biological activity as evidenced by high concentration of adenosine triphosphate. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Water, Air, & Soil Pollution
Issue Date:
30-Jun-2013
DOI:
10.1007/s11270-013-1628-8
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00496979
Sponsors:
This project was conducted under the financial support of the UNESCO-IHE Partnership Research Fund (UPaRF) through NATSYS project no. 32019417. We are thankful to UNESCO-IHE laboratory staff and Dr. Frank Sacher (Technologiezentrum Wasser (TZW), Karlsruhe, Germany) for their analytical support.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAbel, Chol D Ten
dc.contributor.authorSharma, Saroj K.en
dc.contributor.authorMaeng, Sungkyuen
dc.contributor.authorMagic-Knezev, Aleksandraen
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Maria Doloresen
dc.contributor.authorAmy, Gary L.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:11:46Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:11:46Zen
dc.date.issued2013-06-30en
dc.identifier.issn00496979en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11270-013-1628-8en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562827en
dc.description.abstractReduction of bulk organic matter, nitrogen, and pharmaceutically active compounds from primary effluent during managed aquifer recharge was investigated using laboratory-scale batch reactors. Biologically stable batch reactors were spiked with different concentrations of sodium azide to inhibit biological activity and probe the effect of microbial activity on attenuation of various pollutants of concern. The experimental results obtained revealed that removal of dissolved organic carbon correlated with active microbial biomass. Furthermore, addition of 2 mM of sodium azide affected nitrite-oxidizing bacteria leading to accumulation of nitrite-nitrogen in the reactors while an ammonium-nitrogen reduction of 95.5 % was achieved. Removal efficiencies of the hydrophilic neutral compounds phenacetin, paracetamol, and caffeine were independent of the extent of the active microbial biomass and were >90 % in all reactors, whereas removal of pentoxifylline was dependent on the biological stability of the reactor. However, hydrophobic ionic compounds exhibited removal efficiency >80 % in batch reactors with the highest biological activity as evidenced by high concentration of adenosine triphosphate. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis project was conducted under the financial support of the UNESCO-IHE Partnership Research Fund (UPaRF) through NATSYS project no. 32019417. We are thankful to UNESCO-IHE laboratory staff and Dr. Frank Sacher (Technologiezentrum Wasser (TZW), Karlsruhe, Germany) for their analytical support.en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.subjectBulk organic carbonen
dc.subjectNitrogenen
dc.subjectPharmaceutically active compoundsen
dc.subjectPrimary effluenten
dc.subjectSoil aquifer treatmenten
dc.titleFate of bulk organic matter, nitrogen, and pharmaceutically active compounds in batch experiments simulating soil aquifer treatment (SAT) using primary effluenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalWater, Air, & Soil Pollutionen
dc.contributor.institutionUNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, P.O. Box 3015, 2601 DA Delft, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionSejong University, 98 Gunja-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu Seoul 143-747, South Koreaen
dc.contributor.institutionHet Waterlaboratorium, J. W. Lucasweg 2, 2031 BE Haarlem, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionDelft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5048, 2600 GA Delft, Netherlandsen
kaust.authorAmy, Gary L.en
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