Use of beach galleries as an intake for future seawater desalination facilities in Florida and globally similar areas

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562814
Title:
Use of beach galleries as an intake for future seawater desalination facilities in Florida and globally similar areas
Authors:
Missimer, Thomas M.; Maliva,, Robert G.; Dehwah, Abdullah; Phelps, Daniel
Abstract:
Desalination of seawater using the reverse osmosis process can be made less costly by the use of subsurface intake systems. Use of conventional open-ocean intakes requires the addition of a number of pretreatment processes to protect the primary RO process. Despite using the best designs possible for the pretreatment, seawater RO membranes tend to biofoul because of the naturally-occurring organic material and small bacteria present in seawater. These materials are not completely removed by the pretreatment system and they pass through the cartridge filters into the membranes, thereby causing frequent and expensive cleaning of the membranes. Quality of the raw water can be greatly improved by the use of subsurface intakes which can substantially reduce the overall treatment cost. There are a number of possible subsurface designs that can be used including conventional vertical wells, horizontal wells, collector wells, beach galleries, and seabed filters. The key selection criteria for the type of subsurface intake most suited and most cost-effective for a site are based on the required volume of raw water and the local geology. The active shorelines of Florida are very well-suited for the development of beach gallery intake systems. These systems are installed beneath the active beach between the high and low tide zones of the beach. Since they are constructed with a depth to the screens between 3 and 5 m, they cannot be observed at surface and persons using the beach would be unaware of their existence. These galleries are simple to construct and they tend not to clog because the active wave action within the intertidal zone provides mechanical energy that continuously cleans the filter face. They also have other advantages, including: the water quality is seawater unaffected by substances present in freshwater aquifers occurring landward of the shoreline, the salinity of the water is generally constant, and there are no impacts on water users located inland from the shoreline. A comprehensive study of the grain size characteristics of Florida beaches has allowed an assessment to be made of the hydraulic conductivities of the Florida beach sands. Hydraulic conductivity values generally range from 1.8 to 24 m/day, which is more than sufficient to allow the design and construction of high-capacity galleries at a reasonable cost. This type of intake is particularly relevant to the northeast Florida shoreline adjacent to an area being considered for development of a large-capacity seawater desalination system. © 2013 © 2013 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Water Desalination & Reuse Research Cntr; Environmental Science and Engineering Program
Publisher:
Informa UK Limited
Journal:
Desalination and Water Treatment
Issue Date:
17-Jun-2013
DOI:
10.1080/19443994.2013.808406
Type:
Article
ISSN:
19443994
Sponsors:
Funding for this research was provided by the Water Desalination and Reuse Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology and from university faculty discretionary funds.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMissimer, Thomas M.en
dc.contributor.authorMaliva,, Robert G.en
dc.contributor.authorDehwah, Abdullahen
dc.contributor.authorPhelps, Danielen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:11:18Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:11:18Zen
dc.date.issued2013-06-17en
dc.identifier.issn19443994en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/19443994.2013.808406en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562814en
dc.description.abstractDesalination of seawater using the reverse osmosis process can be made less costly by the use of subsurface intake systems. Use of conventional open-ocean intakes requires the addition of a number of pretreatment processes to protect the primary RO process. Despite using the best designs possible for the pretreatment, seawater RO membranes tend to biofoul because of the naturally-occurring organic material and small bacteria present in seawater. These materials are not completely removed by the pretreatment system and they pass through the cartridge filters into the membranes, thereby causing frequent and expensive cleaning of the membranes. Quality of the raw water can be greatly improved by the use of subsurface intakes which can substantially reduce the overall treatment cost. There are a number of possible subsurface designs that can be used including conventional vertical wells, horizontal wells, collector wells, beach galleries, and seabed filters. The key selection criteria for the type of subsurface intake most suited and most cost-effective for a site are based on the required volume of raw water and the local geology. The active shorelines of Florida are very well-suited for the development of beach gallery intake systems. These systems are installed beneath the active beach between the high and low tide zones of the beach. Since they are constructed with a depth to the screens between 3 and 5 m, they cannot be observed at surface and persons using the beach would be unaware of their existence. These galleries are simple to construct and they tend not to clog because the active wave action within the intertidal zone provides mechanical energy that continuously cleans the filter face. They also have other advantages, including: the water quality is seawater unaffected by substances present in freshwater aquifers occurring landward of the shoreline, the salinity of the water is generally constant, and there are no impacts on water users located inland from the shoreline. A comprehensive study of the grain size characteristics of Florida beaches has allowed an assessment to be made of the hydraulic conductivities of the Florida beach sands. Hydraulic conductivity values generally range from 1.8 to 24 m/day, which is more than sufficient to allow the design and construction of high-capacity galleries at a reasonable cost. This type of intake is particularly relevant to the northeast Florida shoreline adjacent to an area being considered for development of a large-capacity seawater desalination system. © 2013 © 2013 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.en
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding for this research was provided by the Water Desalination and Reuse Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology and from university faculty discretionary funds.en
dc.publisherInforma UK Limiteden
dc.subjectBeach galleryen
dc.subjectDesalinationen
dc.subjectDesignen
dc.subjectFloridaen
dc.subjectIntakeen
dc.subjectSeawater reverse osmosisen
dc.titleUse of beach galleries as an intake for future seawater desalination facilities in Florida and globally similar areasen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination & Reuse Research Cntren
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.identifier.journalDesalination and Water Treatmenten
dc.contributor.institutionSchlumberger Water Services, Fort Myers, FL, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionFlorida Geological Survey, Tallahassee, FL, United Statesen
kaust.authorMissimer, Thomas M.en
kaust.authorDehwah, Abdullahen
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