Coastal upwelling linked to toxic Pseudo-nitzschia australis blooms in Los Angeles coastal waters, 2005-2007

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562810
Title:
Coastal upwelling linked to toxic Pseudo-nitzschia australis blooms in Los Angeles coastal waters, 2005-2007
Authors:
Schnetzer, Astrid; Jones, Burton ( 0000-0002-9599-1593 ) ; Schaffner, Rebecca A.; Cetinić, Ivona; Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; Miller, Peter E.; Seubert, Erica L.; Caron, David A.
Abstract:
Harmful algal blooms dominated by the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia spp. have become a perennial but variable event within surface waters near the greater Los Angeles area. Toxic blooms during spring seasons from 2005 to 2007 varied strongly in their overall toxicity and duration. Differences in bloom dynamics were linked to differences in storm-induced river discharge following episodic rain events and coastal upwelling, both major coastal processes that led to the injection of nutrients into coastal surface waters. Heavy river runoff during early 2005, a record-rainfall year, favored a phytoplankton community mainly comprised of algal taxa other than Pseudo-nitzschia. The spring bloom during 2005 was associated with low domoic acid surface concentrations and minor contributions of (mainly) P. delicatissima to the diatom assemblage. In contrast, highly toxic P. australis-dominated blooms during spring seasons of 2006 and 2007 were linked to strong upwelling events. River discharge quotas in 2006 and 2007, in contrast to 2005, fell well below annual averages for the region. Surface toxin levels were linked to colder, more saline (i.e. upwelled) water over the 3-year study, but no such consistent relationship between domoic acid levels and other physiochemical parameters, such as macronutrient concentrations or nutrient ratios, was observed. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Marine Science Program; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Publisher:
Oxford University Press (OUP)
Journal:
Journal of Plankton Research
Issue Date:
10-Jun-2013
DOI:
10.1093/plankt/fbt051
Type:
Article
ISSN:
01427873
Sponsors:
This research was supported by grants from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (Monitoring and Event Response for Harmful Algal Blooms (MERHAB) program MERHAB NA05NO54781228 and Sea Grant NA06OAR4170012) awarded to DC and AS, and Environmental Protection Agency (RD-83170501) awarded to DC.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Marine Science Program; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSchnetzer, Astriden
dc.contributor.authorJones, Burtonen
dc.contributor.authorSchaffner, Rebecca A.en
dc.contributor.authorCetinić, Ivonaen
dc.contributor.authorFitzpatrick, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Peter E.en
dc.contributor.authorSeubert, Erica L.en
dc.contributor.authorCaron, David A.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:11:07Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:11:07Zen
dc.date.issued2013-06-10en
dc.identifier.issn01427873en
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/plankt/fbt051en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562810en
dc.description.abstractHarmful algal blooms dominated by the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia spp. have become a perennial but variable event within surface waters near the greater Los Angeles area. Toxic blooms during spring seasons from 2005 to 2007 varied strongly in their overall toxicity and duration. Differences in bloom dynamics were linked to differences in storm-induced river discharge following episodic rain events and coastal upwelling, both major coastal processes that led to the injection of nutrients into coastal surface waters. Heavy river runoff during early 2005, a record-rainfall year, favored a phytoplankton community mainly comprised of algal taxa other than Pseudo-nitzschia. The spring bloom during 2005 was associated with low domoic acid surface concentrations and minor contributions of (mainly) P. delicatissima to the diatom assemblage. In contrast, highly toxic P. australis-dominated blooms during spring seasons of 2006 and 2007 were linked to strong upwelling events. River discharge quotas in 2006 and 2007, in contrast to 2005, fell well below annual averages for the region. Surface toxin levels were linked to colder, more saline (i.e. upwelled) water over the 3-year study, but no such consistent relationship between domoic acid levels and other physiochemical parameters, such as macronutrient concentrations or nutrient ratios, was observed. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by grants from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (Monitoring and Event Response for Harmful Algal Blooms (MERHAB) program MERHAB NA05NO54781228 and Sea Grant NA06OAR4170012) awarded to DC and AS, and Environmental Protection Agency (RD-83170501) awarded to DC.en
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)en
dc.subjectcoastal upwellingen
dc.subjectdomoic aciden
dc.subjectPseudo-nitzschiaen
dc.subjectriver dischargeen
dc.subjectsouthern Californiaen
dc.titleCoastal upwelling linked to toxic Pseudo-nitzschia australis blooms in Los Angeles coastal waters, 2005-2007en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Programen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Plankton Researchen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionSouthern California Coastal Water Research Project, Costa Mesa, CA 92626, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Marine Sciences, University of Maine, Walpole, ME 04573, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionCanadian Centre for Dna Barcoding, Biodiversity Institute of Ontario, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, N1G2W1, Canadaen
kaust.authorJones, Burtonen
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