Solvent vapor annealing in the molecular regime drastically improves carrier transport in small-molecule thin-film transistors

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562719
Title:
Solvent vapor annealing in the molecular regime drastically improves carrier transport in small-molecule thin-film transistors
Authors:
Khan, Hadayat Ullah; Li, Ruipeng; Ren, Yi; Chen, Long; Payne, Marcia M.; Bhansali, Unnat Sampatraj; Smilgies, Detlef Matthias; Anthony, John Edward; Amassian, Aram ( 0000-0002-5734-1194 )
Abstract:
We demonstrate a new way to investigate and control the solvent vapor annealing of solution-cast organic semiconductor thin films. Solvent vapor annealing of spin-cast films of 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-Pn) is investigated in situ using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) capability, allowing us to monitor both solvent mass uptake and changes in the mechanical rigidity of the film. Using time-resolved grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) and complementary static atomic force microscopy (AFM), we demonstrate that solvent vapor annealing in the molecular regime can cause significant performance improvements in organic thin film transistors (OTFTs), whereas allowing the solvent to percolate and form a liquid phase results in catastrophic reorganization and dewetting of the film, making the process counterproductive. Using these lessons we devise processing conditions which prevent percolation of the adsorbed solvent vapor molecules for extended periods, thus extending the benefits of solvent vapor annealing and improving carrier mobility by nearly two orders of magnitude. Ultimately, it is demonstrated that QCM-D is a very powerful sensor of the state of the adsorbed solvent as well as the thin film, thus making it suitable for process development as well as in-line process monitoring both in laboratory and in future manufacturing settings. © 2013 American Chemical Society.
KAUST Department:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Chemical and Biological Engineering Program; KAUST Solar Center (KSC); Materials Science and Engineering Program; Core Labs; Organic Electronics and Photovoltaics Group
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Journal:
ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
Issue Date:
10-Apr-2013
DOI:
10.1021/am3025195
PubMed ID:
23394109
Type:
Article
ISSN:
19448244
Sponsors:
Part of this work was supported by KAUST's Office of Competitive Research Funds under Award FIC/2010/04. The authors acknowledge use of the D1 beamline at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF DMR-0936384) and NIH-NIGMS.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Chemical and Biological Engineering Program; Materials Science and Engineering Program; KAUST Solar Center (KSC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Hadayat Ullahen
dc.contributor.authorLi, Ruipengen
dc.contributor.authorRen, Yien
dc.contributor.authorChen, Longen
dc.contributor.authorPayne, Marcia M.en
dc.contributor.authorBhansali, Unnat Sampatrajen
dc.contributor.authorSmilgies, Detlef Matthiasen
dc.contributor.authorAnthony, John Edwarden
dc.contributor.authorAmassian, Aramen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:03:01Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:03:01Zen
dc.date.issued2013-04-10en
dc.identifier.issn19448244en
dc.identifier.pmid23394109-
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/am3025195en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562719en
dc.description.abstractWe demonstrate a new way to investigate and control the solvent vapor annealing of solution-cast organic semiconductor thin films. Solvent vapor annealing of spin-cast films of 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-Pn) is investigated in situ using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) capability, allowing us to monitor both solvent mass uptake and changes in the mechanical rigidity of the film. Using time-resolved grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) and complementary static atomic force microscopy (AFM), we demonstrate that solvent vapor annealing in the molecular regime can cause significant performance improvements in organic thin film transistors (OTFTs), whereas allowing the solvent to percolate and form a liquid phase results in catastrophic reorganization and dewetting of the film, making the process counterproductive. Using these lessons we devise processing conditions which prevent percolation of the adsorbed solvent vapor molecules for extended periods, thus extending the benefits of solvent vapor annealing and improving carrier mobility by nearly two orders of magnitude. Ultimately, it is demonstrated that QCM-D is a very powerful sensor of the state of the adsorbed solvent as well as the thin film, thus making it suitable for process development as well as in-line process monitoring both in laboratory and in future manufacturing settings. © 2013 American Chemical Society.en
dc.description.sponsorshipPart of this work was supported by KAUST's Office of Competitive Research Funds under Award FIC/2010/04. The authors acknowledge use of the D1 beamline at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF DMR-0936384) and NIH-NIGMS.en
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Societyen
dc.subjectorganic electronicsen
dc.subjectorganic thin film transistorsen
dc.subjectquartz crystal microbalance with dissipationen
dc.subjectsolution processingen
dc.subjectsolvent vapor annealingen
dc.subjectTIPS-pentaceneen
dc.titleSolvent vapor annealing in the molecular regime drastically improves carrier transport in small-molecule thin-film transistorsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentChemical and Biological Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentKAUST Solar Center (KSC)en
dc.contributor.departmentMaterials Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentCore Labsen
dc.contributor.departmentOrganic Electronics and Photovoltaics Groupen
dc.identifier.journalACS Applied Materials and Interfacesen
dc.contributor.institutionCornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506, United Statesen
kaust.authorLi, Ruipengen
kaust.authorRen, Yien
kaust.authorChen, Longen
kaust.authorBhansali, Unnat Sampatrajen
kaust.authorAmassian, Aramen
kaust.authorKhan, Hadayat Ullahen
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