UV and cold tolerance of a pigment-producing Antarctic Janthinobacterium sp. Ant5-2

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562687
Title:
UV and cold tolerance of a pigment-producing Antarctic Janthinobacterium sp. Ant5-2
Authors:
Mojib, Nazia ( 0000-0003-4924-5538 ) ; Farhoomand, Amin; Andersen, Dale T.; Bej, Asim K.
Abstract:
In this paper, we describe the UV and cold tolerance of a purple violet pigment (PVP)-producing Antarctic bacterium, Janthinobacterium sp. Ant5-2 (PVP+) and compared its physiological adaptations with a pigmentless mutant strain (PVP-). A spontaneous deletion of vioA that codes for tryptophan monooxygenase, the first gene involved in the biosynthesis of PVP was found in PVP- strain. The PVP- culture exhibited significantly reduced survival during exponential and stationary growth phase following exposure to UVB (320 nm) and UVC (254 nm) (dose range: 0-300 J/m2) when compared to wild-type (PVP+) cultures. In addition, upon biochemical inhibition of pigment synthesis by 2(5H)-furanone, wild-type PVP+ cultures exhibited approximately 50-fold growth reduction at a higher dose (300 J/m2) of UV. Increased resistance to UV was observed upon inducing starvation state in both PVP+ and PVP- cultures. There was 80 % (SD = ±8) reduction in extrapolymeric substance (EPS) production in the PVP- cultures along with a compromised survival to freeze-thaw cycles when compared to the PVP+ cultures. Perhaps synthesis of PVP and EPS are among the key adaptive features that define the survival of this bacterium in Antarctic extreme conditions, especially during austral summer months. © 2013 Springer Japan.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Marine Science Program
Publisher:
Springer Verlag
Journal:
Extremophiles
Issue Date:
20-Mar-2013
DOI:
10.1007/s00792-013-0525-9
PubMed ID:
23512118
Type:
Article
ISSN:
14310651
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Marine Science Program

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMojib, Naziaen
dc.contributor.authorFarhoomand, Aminen
dc.contributor.authorAndersen, Dale T.en
dc.contributor.authorBej, Asim K.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:01:30Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:01:30Zen
dc.date.issued2013-03-20en
dc.identifier.issn14310651en
dc.identifier.pmid23512118en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00792-013-0525-9en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562687en
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, we describe the UV and cold tolerance of a purple violet pigment (PVP)-producing Antarctic bacterium, Janthinobacterium sp. Ant5-2 (PVP+) and compared its physiological adaptations with a pigmentless mutant strain (PVP-). A spontaneous deletion of vioA that codes for tryptophan monooxygenase, the first gene involved in the biosynthesis of PVP was found in PVP- strain. The PVP- culture exhibited significantly reduced survival during exponential and stationary growth phase following exposure to UVB (320 nm) and UVC (254 nm) (dose range: 0-300 J/m2) when compared to wild-type (PVP+) cultures. In addition, upon biochemical inhibition of pigment synthesis by 2(5H)-furanone, wild-type PVP+ cultures exhibited approximately 50-fold growth reduction at a higher dose (300 J/m2) of UV. Increased resistance to UV was observed upon inducing starvation state in both PVP+ and PVP- cultures. There was 80 % (SD = ±8) reduction in extrapolymeric substance (EPS) production in the PVP- cultures along with a compromised survival to freeze-thaw cycles when compared to the PVP+ cultures. Perhaps synthesis of PVP and EPS are among the key adaptive features that define the survival of this bacterium in Antarctic extreme conditions, especially during austral summer months. © 2013 Springer Japan.en
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagen
dc.subject2(5H)-furanoneen
dc.subjectALI assayen
dc.subjectD37 valueen
dc.subjectEPSen
dc.subjectFreeze-thawen
dc.subjectPurple violet pigment (PVP)en
dc.subjectvioAen
dc.titleUV and cold tolerance of a pigment-producing Antarctic Janthinobacterium sp. Ant5-2en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Programen
dc.identifier.journalExtremophilesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1300 University Blvd., CH464, Birmingham, 35294-1170 AL, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionCarl Sagan Center for the Study of Life in the Universe, SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Ave., Suite 100, Mountain View, CA, 94043, United Statesen
kaust.authorMojib, Naziaen

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