Imaging by forward propagating the data: Theory and application

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562663
Title:
Imaging by forward propagating the data: Theory and application
Authors:
Zuberi, Akbar; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali ( 0000-0002-9363-9799 )
Abstract:
The forward (modelled) wavefield for conventional reverse time migration (RTM) is computed by extrapolating the wavefield from an estimated source wavelet. In the typical case of a smooth subsurface velocity, this wavefield lacks the components, including surface reflections, necessary to image multiples in the observed data. We, instead, introduce the concept of forward propagating the recorded data, including direct arrivals, as part of RTM. We analyse the influence of the main components of the data on the imaging process, which include direct arrivals, primaries and surface-related multiples. In our RTM methodology, this implies correlating the forward extrapolated recorded data wavefield with its reversely extrapolated version prior to applying the zero-lag cross-correlation imaging condition. The interaction of the data components with each other in the cross-correlation process will image primaries and multiples, as well as introduce cross-talk artefact terms. However, some of these artefacts are present in conventional RTM implementation and they tend to be relatively weak. In fact, for the surface seismic experiment, forward propagating the direct arrivals is almost equivalent to forward propagating a source and it tends to contribute the majority of the data imaging energy. In addition, primaries and multiples recorded in the data become multiples of one higher order. Forward propagating the recorded data to recreate the source will relieve us from the requirement of estimating the source function. It will also include near-surface information necessary to improve the image in areas with near-surface complexity. Data from a simple synthetic layered model, as well as the Marmousi model, are used to demonstrate some of these features. © 2013 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.
KAUST Department:
Earth Science and Engineering Program; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Environmental Science and Engineering Program
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Geophysical Prospecting
Issue Date:
27-Feb-2013
DOI:
10.1111/1365-2478.12006
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00168025
Sponsors:
We would like to thank the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) for funding the research. We also thank members of the Seismic Wave Analysis Group (SWAG) for their help and support. We also thank Felix Herrmann and the reviewers for their review and fruitful suggestions.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Earth Science and Engineering Program

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZuberi, Akbaren
dc.contributor.authorAlkhalifah, Tariq Alien
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T11:00:23Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T11:00:23Zen
dc.date.issued2013-02-27en
dc.identifier.issn00168025en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1365-2478.12006en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562663en
dc.description.abstractThe forward (modelled) wavefield for conventional reverse time migration (RTM) is computed by extrapolating the wavefield from an estimated source wavelet. In the typical case of a smooth subsurface velocity, this wavefield lacks the components, including surface reflections, necessary to image multiples in the observed data. We, instead, introduce the concept of forward propagating the recorded data, including direct arrivals, as part of RTM. We analyse the influence of the main components of the data on the imaging process, which include direct arrivals, primaries and surface-related multiples. In our RTM methodology, this implies correlating the forward extrapolated recorded data wavefield with its reversely extrapolated version prior to applying the zero-lag cross-correlation imaging condition. The interaction of the data components with each other in the cross-correlation process will image primaries and multiples, as well as introduce cross-talk artefact terms. However, some of these artefacts are present in conventional RTM implementation and they tend to be relatively weak. In fact, for the surface seismic experiment, forward propagating the direct arrivals is almost equivalent to forward propagating a source and it tends to contribute the majority of the data imaging energy. In addition, primaries and multiples recorded in the data become multiples of one higher order. Forward propagating the recorded data to recreate the source will relieve us from the requirement of estimating the source function. It will also include near-surface information necessary to improve the image in areas with near-surface complexity. Data from a simple synthetic layered model, as well as the Marmousi model, are used to demonstrate some of these features. © 2013 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe would like to thank the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) for funding the research. We also thank members of the Seismic Wave Analysis Group (SWAG) for their help and support. We also thank Felix Herrmann and the reviewers for their review and fruitful suggestions.en
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.subjectForward propagatingen
dc.subjectMultiplesen
dc.subjectPrimariesen
dc.titleImaging by forward propagating the data: Theory and applicationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentEarth Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.identifier.journalGeophysical Prospectingen
kaust.authorAlkhalifah, Tariq Alien
kaust.authorZuberi, Akbaren
All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.