The rhoptry proteome of Eimeria tenella sporozoites

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562633
Title:
The rhoptry proteome of Eimeria tenella sporozoites
Authors:
Oakes, Richard D.; Kurian, Dominic; Bromley, Elizabeth V.; Ward, Chris; Lal, Kalpana; Blake, Damer P.; Reid, Adam James; Pain, Arnab ( 0000-0002-1755-2819 ) ; Sinden, Robert E.; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Tomley, F. M. M Fiona
Abstract:
Proteins derived from the rhoptry secretory organelles are crucial for the invasion and survival of apicomplexan parasites within host cells. The rhoptries are club-shaped organelles that contain two distinct subpopulations of proteins that localise to separate compartments of the organelle. Proteins from the neck region (rhoptry neck proteins, RON) are secreted early in invasion and a subset of these is critical for the formation and function of the moving junction between parasite and host membranes. Proteins from the bulb compartment (rhoptry protein, ROP) are released later, into the nascent parasitophorous vacuole where they have a role in modifying the vacuolar environment, and into the host cell where they act as key determinants of virulence through their ability to interact with host cell signalling pathways, causing an array of downstream effects. In this paper we present the results of an extensive proteomics analysis of the rhoptry organelles from the coccidian parasite, Eimeria tenella, which is a highly pathogenic parasite of the domestic chicken causing severe caecal coccidiosis. Several different classes of rhoptry protein have been identified. First are the RON proteins that have varying degrees of similarity to proteins of Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. For some RON families, E. tenella expresses more than one gene product and many of the individual RON proteins are differentially expressed between the sporozoite and merozoite developmental stages. The E. tenella sporozoite rhoptry expresses only a limited repertoire of proteins with homology to known ROP proteins from other coccidia, including just two secreted ROP kinases, both of which appear to be equipped for catalytic activity. Finally, a large number of hitherto undescribed proteins that map to the sporozoite rhoptry are identified, many of which have orthologous proteins encoded within the genomes of T. gondii and N. caninum. © 2012 .
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Bioscience Program; Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC); Pathogen Genomics Laboratory
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
International Journal for Parasitology
Issue Date:
Feb-2013
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijpara.2012.10.024
PubMed ID:
23262303
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00207519
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Bioscience Program; Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOakes, Richard D.en
dc.contributor.authorKurian, Dominicen
dc.contributor.authorBromley, Elizabeth V.en
dc.contributor.authorWard, Chrisen
dc.contributor.authorLal, Kalpanaen
dc.contributor.authorBlake, Damer P.en
dc.contributor.authorReid, Adam Jamesen
dc.contributor.authorPain, Arnaben
dc.contributor.authorSinden, Robert E.en
dc.contributor.authorWastling, Jonathan M.en
dc.contributor.authorTomley, F. M. M Fionaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T10:59:10Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T10:59:10Zen
dc.date.issued2013-02en
dc.identifier.issn00207519en
dc.identifier.pmid23262303en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijpara.2012.10.024en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562633en
dc.description.abstractProteins derived from the rhoptry secretory organelles are crucial for the invasion and survival of apicomplexan parasites within host cells. The rhoptries are club-shaped organelles that contain two distinct subpopulations of proteins that localise to separate compartments of the organelle. Proteins from the neck region (rhoptry neck proteins, RON) are secreted early in invasion and a subset of these is critical for the formation and function of the moving junction between parasite and host membranes. Proteins from the bulb compartment (rhoptry protein, ROP) are released later, into the nascent parasitophorous vacuole where they have a role in modifying the vacuolar environment, and into the host cell where they act as key determinants of virulence through their ability to interact with host cell signalling pathways, causing an array of downstream effects. In this paper we present the results of an extensive proteomics analysis of the rhoptry organelles from the coccidian parasite, Eimeria tenella, which is a highly pathogenic parasite of the domestic chicken causing severe caecal coccidiosis. Several different classes of rhoptry protein have been identified. First are the RON proteins that have varying degrees of similarity to proteins of Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. For some RON families, E. tenella expresses more than one gene product and many of the individual RON proteins are differentially expressed between the sporozoite and merozoite developmental stages. The E. tenella sporozoite rhoptry expresses only a limited repertoire of proteins with homology to known ROP proteins from other coccidia, including just two secreted ROP kinases, both of which appear to be equipped for catalytic activity. Finally, a large number of hitherto undescribed proteins that map to the sporozoite rhoptry are identified, many of which have orthologous proteins encoded within the genomes of T. gondii and N. caninum. © 2012 .en
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.subjectApicomplexanen
dc.subjectInvasionen
dc.subjectProtein kinaseen
dc.subjectRONen
dc.subjectROPen
dc.subjectSecretoryen
dc.titleThe rhoptry proteome of Eimeria tenella sporozoitesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentBioscience Programen
dc.contributor.departmentComputational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentPathogen Genomics Laboratoryen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal for Parasitologyen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute for Animal Health, Compton, Newbury, Berkshire, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionRoslin Institute, Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush Campus, Midlothain, Scotland, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Life Sciences, Imperial College, London, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionRoyal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionWellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridgshire, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, Crown Street, Liverpool, United Kingdomen
kaust.authorPain, Arnaben

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