The abundance of herbivorous fish on an inshore Red Sea reef following a mass coral bleaching event

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562611
Title:
The abundance of herbivorous fish on an inshore Red Sea reef following a mass coral bleaching event
Authors:
Khalil, Maha T. ( 0000-0001-6672-523X ) ; Cochran, Jesse ( 0000-0002-6027-5052 ) ; Berumen, Michael L. ( 0000-0003-2463-2742 )
Abstract:
A healthy herbivore community is critical for the ability of a reef to resist and recover from severe disturbances and to regain lost coral cover (i.e., resilience). The densities of the two major herbivorous fish groups (the family Acanthuridae and scarine labrids) were comparatively studied for an inshore reef that was severely impacted by a mass coral bleaching event in 2010 and an unaffected reef within the same region. Densities were found to be significantly higher on the affected reef, most likely due to the high algal densities on that reef. However, densities of herbivores on both reefs were found to be on average about 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than previously published reports from some Pacific reefs and from Red Sea reefs in the Gulf of Aqaba and only slightly higher than Caribbean reefs. Thus, it is predicted that recovery for this reef and similarly affected reefs may be very slow. The protection of herbivores from overfishing and the introduction of other management strategies that maximize reef resilience in Saudi Arabian waters are highly recommended. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Marine Science Program; Reef Ecology Lab
Publisher:
Springer Verlag
Journal:
Environmental Biology of Fishes
Issue Date:
8-Jan-2013
DOI:
10.1007/s10641-012-0103-5
Type:
Article
ISSN:
03781909
Sponsors:
The authors would like to thank SR Thorrold and MI McCormick for their valuable assistance with data collection in the field and two anonymous reviewers whose comments greatly improved the manuscript. J Bouwmeester and E Tyler helped design the study. The project was funded by the Red Sea Research Center at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), and fieldwork was facilitated by the Coastal and Marine Research Core Lab at KAUST. This study was conducted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science awarded to MT Khalil.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Marine Science Program; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKhalil, Maha T.en
dc.contributor.authorCochran, Jesseen
dc.contributor.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T10:58:19Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T10:58:19Zen
dc.date.issued2013-01-08en
dc.identifier.issn03781909en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10641-012-0103-5en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562611en
dc.description.abstractA healthy herbivore community is critical for the ability of a reef to resist and recover from severe disturbances and to regain lost coral cover (i.e., resilience). The densities of the two major herbivorous fish groups (the family Acanthuridae and scarine labrids) were comparatively studied for an inshore reef that was severely impacted by a mass coral bleaching event in 2010 and an unaffected reef within the same region. Densities were found to be significantly higher on the affected reef, most likely due to the high algal densities on that reef. However, densities of herbivores on both reefs were found to be on average about 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than previously published reports from some Pacific reefs and from Red Sea reefs in the Gulf of Aqaba and only slightly higher than Caribbean reefs. Thus, it is predicted that recovery for this reef and similarly affected reefs may be very slow. The protection of herbivores from overfishing and the introduction of other management strategies that maximize reef resilience in Saudi Arabian waters are highly recommended. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors would like to thank SR Thorrold and MI McCormick for their valuable assistance with data collection in the field and two anonymous reviewers whose comments greatly improved the manuscript. J Bouwmeester and E Tyler helped design the study. The project was funded by the Red Sea Research Center at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), and fieldwork was facilitated by the Coastal and Marine Research Core Lab at KAUST. This study was conducted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science awarded to MT Khalil.en
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagen
dc.subjectBleachingen
dc.subjectCentral Red Seaen
dc.subjectHerbivoryen
dc.subjectParrotfishen
dc.subjectSaudi Arabiaen
dc.subjectSurgeonfishen
dc.titleThe abundance of herbivorous fish on an inshore Red Sea reef following a mass coral bleaching eventen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Programen
dc.contributor.departmentReef Ecology Laben
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental Biology of Fishesen
dc.contributor.institutionBiology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, 02543, United Statesen
kaust.authorKhalil, Maha T.en
kaust.authorCochran, Jesseen
kaust.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
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