Collection of Condensate Water: Global Potential and Water Quality Impacts

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562473
Title:
Collection of Condensate Water: Global Potential and Water Quality Impacts
Authors:
Loveless, Kolin Joseph; Farooq, Aamir ( 0000-0001-5296-2197 ) ; Ghaffour, Noreddine ( 0000-0003-2095-4736 )
Abstract:
Water is a valuable resource throughout the world, especially in hot, dry climates and regions experiencing significant population growth. Supplies of fresh water are complicated by the economic and political conditions in many of these regions. Technologies that can supply fresh water at a reduced cost are therefore becoming increasingly important and the impact of such technologies can be substantial. This paper considers the collection of condensate water from large air conditioning units as a possible method to alleviate water scarcity issues. Using the results of a climate model that tested data collected from 2000 to 2010, we have identified areas in the world with the greatest collection potential. We gave special consideration to areas with known water scarcities, including the coastal regions of the Arabian Peninsula, Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. We found that the quality of the collected water is an important criterion in determining the potential uses for this water. Condensate water samples were collected from a few locations in Saudi Arabia and detailed characterizations were conducted to determine the quality of this water. We found that the quality of condensate water collected from various locations and types of air conditioners was very high with conductivities reaching as low as 18 μS/cm and turbidities of 0. 041 NTU. The quality of the collected condensate was close to that of distilled water and, with low-cost polishing treatments, such as ion exchange resins and electrochemical processes, the condensate quality could easily reach that of potable water. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.
KAUST Department:
Clean Combustion Research Center; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Mechanical Engineering Program; Chemical Kinetics & Laser Sensors Laboratory
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Water Resources Management
Issue Date:
28-Dec-2012
DOI:
10.1007/s11269-012-0241-8
Type:
Article
ISSN:
09204741
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Mechanical Engineering Program; Clean Combustion Research Center; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLoveless, Kolin Josephen
dc.contributor.authorFarooq, Aamiren
dc.contributor.authorGhaffour, Noreddineen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T10:39:29Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T10:39:29Zen
dc.date.issued2012-12-28en
dc.identifier.issn09204741en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11269-012-0241-8en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562473en
dc.description.abstractWater is a valuable resource throughout the world, especially in hot, dry climates and regions experiencing significant population growth. Supplies of fresh water are complicated by the economic and political conditions in many of these regions. Technologies that can supply fresh water at a reduced cost are therefore becoming increasingly important and the impact of such technologies can be substantial. This paper considers the collection of condensate water from large air conditioning units as a possible method to alleviate water scarcity issues. Using the results of a climate model that tested data collected from 2000 to 2010, we have identified areas in the world with the greatest collection potential. We gave special consideration to areas with known water scarcities, including the coastal regions of the Arabian Peninsula, Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. We found that the quality of the collected water is an important criterion in determining the potential uses for this water. Condensate water samples were collected from a few locations in Saudi Arabia and detailed characterizations were conducted to determine the quality of this water. We found that the quality of condensate water collected from various locations and types of air conditioners was very high with conductivities reaching as low as 18 μS/cm and turbidities of 0. 041 NTU. The quality of the collected condensate was close to that of distilled water and, with low-cost polishing treatments, such as ion exchange resins and electrochemical processes, the condensate quality could easily reach that of potable water. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11269-012-0241-8en
dc.subjectAir conditioning systemsen
dc.subjectClimate modelen
dc.subjectCondensate water collectionen
dc.subjectWater qualityen
dc.subjectWater scarcityen
dc.titleCollection of Condensate Water: Global Potential and Water Quality Impactsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentClean Combustion Research Centeren
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentChemical Kinetics & Laser Sensors Laboratoryen
dc.identifier.journalWater Resources Managementen
dc.eprint.versionPre-printen
kaust.authorFarooq, Aamiren
kaust.authorGhaffour, Noreddineen
kaust.authorLoveless, Kolin Josephen
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