Algal toxins and reverse osmosis desalination operations: Laboratory bench testing and field monitoring of domoic acid, saxitoxin, brevetoxin and okadaic acid

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562443
Title:
Algal toxins and reverse osmosis desalination operations: Laboratory bench testing and field monitoring of domoic acid, saxitoxin, brevetoxin and okadaic acid
Authors:
Seubert, Erica L.; Trussell, Shane; Eagleton, John; Schnetzer, Astrid; Cetinić, Ivona; Lauri, Phil; Jones, Burton ( 0000-0002-9599-1593 ) ; Caron, David A.
Abstract:
The occurrence and intensity of harmful algal blooms (HABs) have been increasing globally during the past few decades. The impact of these events on seawater desalination facilities has become an important topic in recent years due to enhanced societal interest and reliance on this technology for augmenting world water supplies. A variety of harmful bloom-forming species of microalgae occur in southern California, as well as many other locations throughout the world, and several of these species are known to produce potent neurotoxins. These algal toxins can cause a myriad of human health issues, including death, when ingested via contaminated seafood. This study was designed to investigate the impact that algal toxin presence may have on both the intake and reverse osmosis (RO) desalination process; most importantly, whether or not the naturally occurring algal toxins can pass through the RO membrane and into the desalination product. Bench-scale RO experiments were conducted to explore the potential of extracellular algal toxins contaminating the RO product. Concentrations exceeding maximal values previously reported during natural blooms were used in the laboratory experiments, with treatments comprised of 50 μg/L of domoic acid (DA), 2 μg/L of saxitoxin (STX) and 20 μg/L of brevetoxin (PbTx). None of the algal toxins used in the bench-scale experiments were detectable in the desalinated product water. Monitoring for intracellular and extracellular concentrations of DA, STX, PbTx and okadaic acid (OA) within the intake and desalinated water from a pilot RO desalination plant in El Segundo, CA, was conducted from 2005 to 2009. During the five-year monitoring period, DA and STX were detected sporadically in the intake waters but never in the desalinated water. PbTx and OA were not detected in either the intake or desalinated water. The results of this study demonstrate the potential for HAB toxins to be inducted into coastal RO intake facilities, and the ability of typical RO operations to effectively remove these toxins. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Marine Science Program; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Water Research
Issue Date:
Dec-2012
DOI:
10.1016/j.watres.2012.09.042
PubMed ID:
23079130
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00431354
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Marine Science Program; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSeubert, Erica L.en
dc.contributor.authorTrussell, Shaneen
dc.contributor.authorEagleton, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorSchnetzer, Astriden
dc.contributor.authorCetinić, Ivonaen
dc.contributor.authorLauri, Philen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Burtonen
dc.contributor.authorCaron, David A.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T10:38:22Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T10:38:22Zen
dc.date.issued2012-12en
dc.identifier.issn00431354en
dc.identifier.pmid23079130en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2012.09.042en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562443en
dc.description.abstractThe occurrence and intensity of harmful algal blooms (HABs) have been increasing globally during the past few decades. The impact of these events on seawater desalination facilities has become an important topic in recent years due to enhanced societal interest and reliance on this technology for augmenting world water supplies. A variety of harmful bloom-forming species of microalgae occur in southern California, as well as many other locations throughout the world, and several of these species are known to produce potent neurotoxins. These algal toxins can cause a myriad of human health issues, including death, when ingested via contaminated seafood. This study was designed to investigate the impact that algal toxin presence may have on both the intake and reverse osmosis (RO) desalination process; most importantly, whether or not the naturally occurring algal toxins can pass through the RO membrane and into the desalination product. Bench-scale RO experiments were conducted to explore the potential of extracellular algal toxins contaminating the RO product. Concentrations exceeding maximal values previously reported during natural blooms were used in the laboratory experiments, with treatments comprised of 50 μg/L of domoic acid (DA), 2 μg/L of saxitoxin (STX) and 20 μg/L of brevetoxin (PbTx). None of the algal toxins used in the bench-scale experiments were detectable in the desalinated product water. Monitoring for intracellular and extracellular concentrations of DA, STX, PbTx and okadaic acid (OA) within the intake and desalinated water from a pilot RO desalination plant in El Segundo, CA, was conducted from 2005 to 2009. During the five-year monitoring period, DA and STX were detected sporadically in the intake waters but never in the desalinated water. PbTx and OA were not detected in either the intake or desalinated water. The results of this study demonstrate the potential for HAB toxins to be inducted into coastal RO intake facilities, and the ability of typical RO operations to effectively remove these toxins. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectAlgal toxinsen
dc.subjectDesalinationen
dc.subjectHarmful algal bloomsen
dc.subjectReverse osmosisen
dc.titleAlgal toxins and reverse osmosis desalination operations: Laboratory bench testing and field monitoring of domoic acid, saxitoxin, brevetoxin and okadaic aciden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Programen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalWater Researchen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, 3616 Trousdale Parkway, AHF 301, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0371, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionTrussell Technologies Inc., 6540 Lusk Boulevard, Suite C175, San Diego, CA 92121, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionSeparation Processes Inc., 3156 Lionshead Ave., Suite 2, Carlsbad, CA 92010, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionWest Basin Municipal Water District, 17140 Avalon Blvd., Suite 210, Carson, CA 90746, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionToray Membrane USA Inc., 12233 Thatcher Court, Poway, CA 92064, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State University, 4148 Jordan Hall, Raleigh, NC 27695, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Marine Sciences, University of Maine, Darling Marine Center, Walpole, ME 04573, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionMesa Consolidated Water District, 1965 Placentia Ave., Costa Mesa, CA 92627, United Statesen
kaust.authorJones, Burtonen

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