Identification of effluent organic matter fractions responsible for low-pressure membrane fouling

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562381
Title:
Identification of effluent organic matter fractions responsible for low-pressure membrane fouling
Authors:
Filloux, Emmanuelle; Gallard, Hervé; Croue, Jean-Philippe
Abstract:
Anion exchange resin (AER), powder activated carbon (PAC) adsorption and ozonation treatments were applied on biologically treated wastewater effluent with the objective to modify the effluent organic matter (EfOM) matrix. Both AER and PAC led to significant total organic carbon (TOC) removal, while the TOC remained nearly constant after ozonation. Liquid Chromatography-Organic Carbon Detection (LC-OCD) analysis showed that the AER treatment preferentially removed high and intermediate molecular weight (MW) humic-like structures while PAC removed low MW compounds. Only a small reduction of the high MW colloids (i.e. biopolymers) was observed for AER and PAC treatments. Ozonation induced a large reduction of the biopolymers and an important increase of the low MW humic substances (i.e. building blocks).Single-cycle microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) tests were conducted using commercially available hollow fibres at a constant flux. After reconcentration to their original organic carbon content, the EfOM matrix modified by AER and PAC treatments exhibited higher UF membrane fouling compared to untreated effluent; result that correlated with the higher concentration of biopolymers. On the contrary, ozonation which induced a significant degradation of the biopolymers led to a minor flux reduction for both UF and MF filtration tests. Based on a single filtration, results indicate that biopolymers play a major role in low pressure membrane fouling and that intermediate and low MW compounds have minor impact. Thus, this approach has shown to be a valid methodology to identify the foulant fractions of EfOM. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Water Research
Issue Date:
Nov-2012
DOI:
10.1016/j.watres.2012.07.034
PubMed ID:
22884373
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00431354
Sponsors:
This project was financially supported by Veolia Environment Research & Innovation, Maisons-Laffitte (France).
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFilloux, Emmanuelleen
dc.contributor.authorGallard, Hervéen
dc.contributor.authorCroue, Jean-Philippeen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T10:03:12Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T10:03:12Zen
dc.date.issued2012-11en
dc.identifier.issn00431354en
dc.identifier.pmid22884373en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2012.07.034en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562381en
dc.description.abstractAnion exchange resin (AER), powder activated carbon (PAC) adsorption and ozonation treatments were applied on biologically treated wastewater effluent with the objective to modify the effluent organic matter (EfOM) matrix. Both AER and PAC led to significant total organic carbon (TOC) removal, while the TOC remained nearly constant after ozonation. Liquid Chromatography-Organic Carbon Detection (LC-OCD) analysis showed that the AER treatment preferentially removed high and intermediate molecular weight (MW) humic-like structures while PAC removed low MW compounds. Only a small reduction of the high MW colloids (i.e. biopolymers) was observed for AER and PAC treatments. Ozonation induced a large reduction of the biopolymers and an important increase of the low MW humic substances (i.e. building blocks).Single-cycle microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) tests were conducted using commercially available hollow fibres at a constant flux. After reconcentration to their original organic carbon content, the EfOM matrix modified by AER and PAC treatments exhibited higher UF membrane fouling compared to untreated effluent; result that correlated with the higher concentration of biopolymers. On the contrary, ozonation which induced a significant degradation of the biopolymers led to a minor flux reduction for both UF and MF filtration tests. Based on a single filtration, results indicate that biopolymers play a major role in low pressure membrane fouling and that intermediate and low MW compounds have minor impact. Thus, this approach has shown to be a valid methodology to identify the foulant fractions of EfOM. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis project was financially supported by Veolia Environment Research & Innovation, Maisons-Laffitte (France).en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectAnion exchange resinen
dc.subjectEffluent organic matteren
dc.subjectMembrane foulingen
dc.subjectOzoneen
dc.subjectPowder activated carbonen
dc.subjectWastewater reuseen
dc.titleIdentification of effluent organic matter fractions responsible for low-pressure membrane foulingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalWater Researchen
dc.contributor.institutionVeolia Environm Res & Innovat, F-78603 Maisons Laffitte, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniv Poitiers, Inst Chim Milieux & Mat Poitiers, Equipe Chim Eau & Traitement Eau, UMR CNRS 7285, F-86000 Poitiers, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionUniv Queensland, Adv Water Management Ctr, St Lucia, Qld 4072, Australiaen
kaust.authorCroue, Jean-Philippeen
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