Arabidopsis plastid AMOS1/EGY1 integrates abscisic acid signaling to regulate global gene expression response to ammonium stress

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562364
Title:
Arabidopsis plastid AMOS1/EGY1 integrates abscisic acid signaling to regulate global gene expression response to ammonium stress
Authors:
Li, Baohai; Li, Qing; Xiong, Liming ( 0000-0001-8099-0806 ) ; Kronzucker, Herbert J.; Krämer, Ute; Shi, Weiming
Abstract:
Ammonium (NH4 +) is a ubiquitous intermediate of nitrogen metabolism but is notorious for its toxic effects on most organisms. Extensive studies of the underlying mechanisms of NH4 + toxicity have been reported in plants, but it is poorly understood how plants acclimate to high levels of NH4 +. Here, we identified an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant, ammonium overly sensitive1 (amos1), that displays severe chlorosis under NH4 + stress. Map-based cloning shows amos1 to carry a mutation in EGY1 (for ethylene-dependent, gravitropism-deficient, and yellow-green-like protein1), which encodes a plastid metalloprotease. Transcriptomic analysis reveals that among the genes activated in response to NH4 +, 90% are regulated dependent on AMOS1/ EGY1. Furthermore, 63% of AMOS1/EGY1-dependent NH4 +-activated genes contain an ACGTG motif in their promoter region, a core motif of abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive elements. Consistent with this, our physiological, pharmacological, transcriptomic, and genetic data show that ABA signaling is a critical, but not the sole, downstream component of the AMOS1/EGY1-dependent pathway that regulates the expression of NH4 +-responsive genes and maintains chloroplast functionality under NH4 + stress. Importantly, abi4 mutants defective in ABA-dependent and retrograde signaling, but not ABA-deficient mutants, mimic leaf NH4 + hypersensitivity of amos1. In summary, our findings suggest that an NH4 +-responsive plastid retrograde pathway, which depends on AMOS1/EGY1 function and integrates with ABA signaling, is required for the regulation of expression of the presence of high NH4 + levels. © 2012 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.
KAUST Department:
Center for Desert Agriculture; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Bioscience Program; Plant Stress Genomics Research Lab
Publisher:
American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB)
Journal:
PLANT PHYSIOLOGY
Issue Date:
12-Oct-2012
DOI:
10.1104/pp.112.206508
PubMed ID:
23064408
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3510130
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00320889
Sponsors:
This work was supported by the National Science Foundation of China (grant nos. 31200189 and 30771285), the Chinese Academy Sciences Innovation Program (grant no. ISSASIP1103), the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (grant no. 217277-2009), and the National Nature Science Foundation (grant nos. 91017013 and 31070327).
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3510130
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Bioscience Program; Center for Desert Agriculture; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLi, Baohaien
dc.contributor.authorLi, Qingen
dc.contributor.authorXiong, Limingen
dc.contributor.authorKronzucker, Herbert J.en
dc.contributor.authorKrämer, Uteen
dc.contributor.authorShi, Weimingen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T10:02:34Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T10:02:34Zen
dc.date.issued2012-10-12en
dc.identifier.issn00320889en
dc.identifier.pmid23064408en
dc.identifier.doi10.1104/pp.112.206508en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562364en
dc.description.abstractAmmonium (NH4 +) is a ubiquitous intermediate of nitrogen metabolism but is notorious for its toxic effects on most organisms. Extensive studies of the underlying mechanisms of NH4 + toxicity have been reported in plants, but it is poorly understood how plants acclimate to high levels of NH4 +. Here, we identified an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant, ammonium overly sensitive1 (amos1), that displays severe chlorosis under NH4 + stress. Map-based cloning shows amos1 to carry a mutation in EGY1 (for ethylene-dependent, gravitropism-deficient, and yellow-green-like protein1), which encodes a plastid metalloprotease. Transcriptomic analysis reveals that among the genes activated in response to NH4 +, 90% are regulated dependent on AMOS1/ EGY1. Furthermore, 63% of AMOS1/EGY1-dependent NH4 +-activated genes contain an ACGTG motif in their promoter region, a core motif of abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive elements. Consistent with this, our physiological, pharmacological, transcriptomic, and genetic data show that ABA signaling is a critical, but not the sole, downstream component of the AMOS1/EGY1-dependent pathway that regulates the expression of NH4 +-responsive genes and maintains chloroplast functionality under NH4 + stress. Importantly, abi4 mutants defective in ABA-dependent and retrograde signaling, but not ABA-deficient mutants, mimic leaf NH4 + hypersensitivity of amos1. In summary, our findings suggest that an NH4 +-responsive plastid retrograde pathway, which depends on AMOS1/EGY1 function and integrates with ABA signaling, is required for the regulation of expression of the presence of high NH4 + levels. © 2012 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the National Science Foundation of China (grant nos. 31200189 and 30771285), the Chinese Academy Sciences Innovation Program (grant no. ISSASIP1103), the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (grant no. 217277-2009), and the National Nature Science Foundation (grant nos. 91017013 and 31070327).en
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3510130en
dc.titleArabidopsis plastid AMOS1/EGY1 integrates abscisic acid signaling to regulate global gene expression response to ammonium stressen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Desert Agricultureen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentBioscience Programen
dc.contributor.departmentPlant Stress Genomics Research Laben
dc.identifier.journalPLANT PHYSIOLOGYen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3510130en
dc.contributor.institutionState Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, Chinaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biological Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M1C 1A4, Canadaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Plant Physiology, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44801 Bochum, Germanyen
kaust.authorXiong, Limingen

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