Deep Sequencing of Myxilla (Ectyomyxilla) methanophila, an Epibiotic Sponge on Cold-Seep Tubeworms, Reveals Methylotrophic, Thiotrophic, and Putative Hydrocarbon-Degrading Microbial Associations

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562363
Title:
Deep Sequencing of Myxilla (Ectyomyxilla) methanophila, an Epibiotic Sponge on Cold-Seep Tubeworms, Reveals Methylotrophic, Thiotrophic, and Putative Hydrocarbon-Degrading Microbial Associations
Authors:
Arellano, Shawn M.; Lee, Onon; Lafi, Feras Fawzi; Yang, Jiangke; Wang, Yong; Young, Craig; Qian, Peiyuan
Abstract:
The encrusting sponge Myxilla (Ectyomyxilla) methanophila (Poecilosclerida: Myxillidae) is an epibiont on vestimentiferan tubeworms at hydrocarbon seeps on the upper Louisiana slope of the Gulf of Mexico. It has long been suggested that this sponge harbors methylotrophic bacteria due to its low δ13C value and high methanol dehydrogenase activity, yet the full community of microbial associations in M. methanophila remained uncharacterized. In this study, we sequenced 16S rRNA genes representing the microbial community in M. methanophila collected from two hydrocarbon-seep sites (GC234 and Bush Hill) using both Sanger sequencing and next-generation 454 pyrosequencing technologies. Additionally, we compared the microbial community in M. methanophila to that of the biofilm collected from the associated tubeworm. Our results revealed that the microbial diversity in the sponges from both sites was low but the community structure was largely similar, showing a high proportion of methylotrophic bacteria of the genus Methylohalomonas and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria of the genera Cycloclasticus and Neptunomonas. Furthermore, the sponge microbial clone library revealed the dominance of thioautotrophic gammaproteobacterial symbionts in M. methanophila. In contrast, the biofilm communities on the tubeworms were more diverse and dominated by the chemoorganotrophic Moritella at GC234 and methylotrophic Methylomonas and Methylohalomonas at Bush Hill. Overall, our study provides evidence to support previous suggestion that M. methanophila harbors methylotrophic symbionts and also reveals the association of PAH-degrading and thioautotrophic microbes in the sponge. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York.
KAUST Department:
KAUST Global Collaborative Research Program; Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC); Center for Desert Agriculture
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Microbial Ecology
Issue Date:
11-Oct-2012
DOI:
10.1007/s00248-012-0130-y
PubMed ID:
23052927
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00953628
Sponsors:
We gratefully acknowledge Mr. Rick Webb, at the Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis (University of Queensland), who performed the TEM. We also thank Dr. Salim Bougouffa (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology) for the useful advice in bioinformatics and data analysis. Ship time and submersible dives were funded by grant number OCE-0527139 from the National Science Foundation to CMY. This research was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program, No. 2012CB417304) and an award (SA-C0040/UK-C0016) made by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology to PYQ. SMA was supported by a Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution postdoctoral scholarship during manuscript preparation.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Center for Desert Agriculture; Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorArellano, Shawn M.en
dc.contributor.authorLee, Ononen
dc.contributor.authorLafi, Feras Fawzien
dc.contributor.authorYang, Jiangkeen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yongen
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Craigen
dc.contributor.authorQian, Peiyuanen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T10:02:31Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T10:02:31Zen
dc.date.issued2012-10-11en
dc.identifier.issn00953628en
dc.identifier.pmid23052927en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00248-012-0130-yen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562363en
dc.description.abstractThe encrusting sponge Myxilla (Ectyomyxilla) methanophila (Poecilosclerida: Myxillidae) is an epibiont on vestimentiferan tubeworms at hydrocarbon seeps on the upper Louisiana slope of the Gulf of Mexico. It has long been suggested that this sponge harbors methylotrophic bacteria due to its low δ13C value and high methanol dehydrogenase activity, yet the full community of microbial associations in M. methanophila remained uncharacterized. In this study, we sequenced 16S rRNA genes representing the microbial community in M. methanophila collected from two hydrocarbon-seep sites (GC234 and Bush Hill) using both Sanger sequencing and next-generation 454 pyrosequencing technologies. Additionally, we compared the microbial community in M. methanophila to that of the biofilm collected from the associated tubeworm. Our results revealed that the microbial diversity in the sponges from both sites was low but the community structure was largely similar, showing a high proportion of methylotrophic bacteria of the genus Methylohalomonas and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria of the genera Cycloclasticus and Neptunomonas. Furthermore, the sponge microbial clone library revealed the dominance of thioautotrophic gammaproteobacterial symbionts in M. methanophila. In contrast, the biofilm communities on the tubeworms were more diverse and dominated by the chemoorganotrophic Moritella at GC234 and methylotrophic Methylomonas and Methylohalomonas at Bush Hill. Overall, our study provides evidence to support previous suggestion that M. methanophila harbors methylotrophic symbionts and also reveals the association of PAH-degrading and thioautotrophic microbes in the sponge. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe gratefully acknowledge Mr. Rick Webb, at the Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis (University of Queensland), who performed the TEM. We also thank Dr. Salim Bougouffa (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology) for the useful advice in bioinformatics and data analysis. Ship time and submersible dives were funded by grant number OCE-0527139 from the National Science Foundation to CMY. This research was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program, No. 2012CB417304) and an award (SA-C0040/UK-C0016) made by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology to PYQ. SMA was supported by a Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution postdoctoral scholarship during manuscript preparation.en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.titleDeep Sequencing of Myxilla (Ectyomyxilla) methanophila, an Epibiotic Sponge on Cold-Seep Tubeworms, Reveals Methylotrophic, Thiotrophic, and Putative Hydrocarbon-Degrading Microbial Associationsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentKAUST Global Collaborative Research Programen
dc.contributor.departmentComputational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Desert Agricultureen
dc.identifier.journalMicrobial Ecologyen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biology, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, 02536, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionOregon Institute of Marine Biology, University of Oregon, P.O. Box 5389, Charleston, OR, 97420, United Statesen
kaust.authorLafi, Feras Fawzien

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