Pharmaceutical removal during managed aquifer recharge with pretreatment by advanced oxidation

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562355
Title:
Pharmaceutical removal during managed aquifer recharge with pretreatment by advanced oxidation
Authors:
Lekkerkerker-Teunissen, Karin; Chekol, E. T.; Maeng, Sungkyu; Ghebremichael, Kebreab A.; Houtman, Corine J.; Verliefde, Arne R. D.; Verberk, J. Q J C; Amy, Gary L.; Van Dijk, Johannis C.
Abstract:
Organic micropollutants (OMPs) are detected in sources for drinking water and treatment possibilities are investigated. Innovative removal technologies are available such as membrane filtration and advanced oxidation, but also biological treatment should be considered. By combining an advanced oxidation process with managed aquifer recharge (MAR), two complementary processes are expected to provide a hybrid system for OMP removal, according to the multiple barrier approach. Laboratory scale batch reactor experiments were conducted to investigate the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and 14 different pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) from MAR influent water and water subjected to oxidation, under different process conditions. A DOC removal of 10% was found in water under oxic (aerobic) conditions for batch reactor experiments, a similar value for DOC removal was observed in the field. Batch reactor experiments for the removal of PhACs showed that the removal of pharmaceuticals ranged from negligible to more than 90%. Under oxic conditions, seven out of 14 pharmaceuticals were removed over 90% and 12 out of 14 pharmaceuticals were removed at more than 50% during 30 days of experiments. Under anoxic conditions, four out of 14 pharmaceuticals were removed over 90% and eight out of 14 pharmaceuticals were removed at more than 50% over 30 days' experiments. Carbamazepine and phenazone were persistent both under oxic and anoxic conditions. The PhACs removal efficiency with oxidized water was, for most compounds, comparable to the removal with MAR influent water. Copyright © IWA Publishing 2012.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Publisher:
IWA Publishing
Journal:
Water Science & Technology: Water Supply
Issue Date:
Oct-2012
DOI:
10.2166/ws.2012.050
Type:
Article
ISSN:
16069749
Sponsors:
The authors would like to acknowledge the NWO Casimir program for financial support for this research.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLekkerkerker-Teunissen, Karinen
dc.contributor.authorChekol, E. T.en
dc.contributor.authorMaeng, Sungkyuen
dc.contributor.authorGhebremichael, Kebreab A.en
dc.contributor.authorHoutman, Corine J.en
dc.contributor.authorVerliefde, Arne R. D.en
dc.contributor.authorVerberk, J. Q J Cen
dc.contributor.authorAmy, Gary L.en
dc.contributor.authorVan Dijk, Johannis C.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T10:02:10Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T10:02:10Zen
dc.date.issued2012-10en
dc.identifier.issn16069749en
dc.identifier.doi10.2166/ws.2012.050en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562355en
dc.description.abstractOrganic micropollutants (OMPs) are detected in sources for drinking water and treatment possibilities are investigated. Innovative removal technologies are available such as membrane filtration and advanced oxidation, but also biological treatment should be considered. By combining an advanced oxidation process with managed aquifer recharge (MAR), two complementary processes are expected to provide a hybrid system for OMP removal, according to the multiple barrier approach. Laboratory scale batch reactor experiments were conducted to investigate the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and 14 different pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) from MAR influent water and water subjected to oxidation, under different process conditions. A DOC removal of 10% was found in water under oxic (aerobic) conditions for batch reactor experiments, a similar value for DOC removal was observed in the field. Batch reactor experiments for the removal of PhACs showed that the removal of pharmaceuticals ranged from negligible to more than 90%. Under oxic conditions, seven out of 14 pharmaceuticals were removed over 90% and 12 out of 14 pharmaceuticals were removed at more than 50% during 30 days of experiments. Under anoxic conditions, four out of 14 pharmaceuticals were removed over 90% and eight out of 14 pharmaceuticals were removed at more than 50% over 30 days' experiments. Carbamazepine and phenazone were persistent both under oxic and anoxic conditions. The PhACs removal efficiency with oxidized water was, for most compounds, comparable to the removal with MAR influent water. Copyright © IWA Publishing 2012.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors would like to acknowledge the NWO Casimir program for financial support for this research.en
dc.publisherIWA Publishingen
dc.subjectDrinking wateren
dc.subjectMARen
dc.subjectOrganic micropollutantsen
dc.subjectOxic conditionsen
dc.subjectOzonationen
dc.subjectSoil passageen
dc.titlePharmaceutical removal during managed aquifer recharge with pretreatment by advanced oxidationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalWater Science & Technology: Water Supplyen
dc.contributor.institutionDunea, PO 34, 2270 AA, Voorburg, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionDelft University of Technology, PO 5048, 2600 GA, Delft, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionUNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Westvest 7, 2601 DA Delft, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionPatel School of Global Sustainability, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionSejong University, 98 Gunja-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-747, South Koreaen
dc.contributor.institutionWater Laboratory, PO Box 734, 2300 RS Haarlem, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionParticle and Interfacial Technology Group, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Gent, Belgiumen
kaust.authorAmy, Gary L.en
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