Water reuse in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia - Status, prospects and research needs

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562354
Title:
Water reuse in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia - Status, prospects and research needs
Authors:
Drewes, Jorg; Garduño, C. Patricio Roa; Amy, Gary L.
Abstract:
Saudi Arabia is one of the driest countries in the world. While desalination plants currently installed in the country represent 30% of the world's desalination capacity, seawater desalination alone will not be able to provide sufficient supplies to meet the increasing freshwater demand. However, with only 9% of the total municipal wastewater generated currently being reused, the kingdom is projected as the third largest reuse market after China and the USA, and reuse capacities are projected to increase by 800% by 2016. This projected growth and the change in water portfolios offer tremendous opportunities to integrate novel approaches of water reclamation and reuse. This paper highlights the current status of reuse in the kingdom, discusses prospects of using distributed infrastructure for reuse tailored to local needs as well as the use of artificial recharge and recovery systems for reclaimed water. It also suggests research needs to helping overcoming barriers for wastewater reuse. Copyright © IWA Publishing 2012.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Water Desalination & Reuse Research Cntr; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Publisher:
IWA Publishing
Journal:
Water Science & Technology: Water Supply
Issue Date:
Oct-2012
DOI:
10.2166/ws.2012.063
Type:
Article
ISSN:
16069749
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDrewes, Jorgen
dc.contributor.authorGarduño, C. Patricio Roaen
dc.contributor.authorAmy, Gary L.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T10:02:08Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T10:02:08Zen
dc.date.issued2012-10en
dc.identifier.issn16069749en
dc.identifier.doi10.2166/ws.2012.063en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562354en
dc.description.abstractSaudi Arabia is one of the driest countries in the world. While desalination plants currently installed in the country represent 30% of the world's desalination capacity, seawater desalination alone will not be able to provide sufficient supplies to meet the increasing freshwater demand. However, with only 9% of the total municipal wastewater generated currently being reused, the kingdom is projected as the third largest reuse market after China and the USA, and reuse capacities are projected to increase by 800% by 2016. This projected growth and the change in water portfolios offer tremendous opportunities to integrate novel approaches of water reclamation and reuse. This paper highlights the current status of reuse in the kingdom, discusses prospects of using distributed infrastructure for reuse tailored to local needs as well as the use of artificial recharge and recovery systems for reclaimed water. It also suggests research needs to helping overcoming barriers for wastewater reuse. Copyright © IWA Publishing 2012.en
dc.publisherIWA Publishingen
dc.subjectCrop irrigationen
dc.subjectGroundwater rechargeen
dc.subjectSaudi Arabiaen
dc.subjectWater reclamationen
dc.subjectWater reuseen
dc.titleWater reuse in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia - Status, prospects and research needsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination & Reuse Research Cntren
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalWater Science & Technology: Water Supplyen
dc.contributor.institutionNSF Engineering Research Center ReNUWIt, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401-1887, United Statesen
kaust.authorDrewes, Jorgen
kaust.authorAmy, Gary L.en
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