Avoiding conflicts and protecting coral reefs: Customary management benefits marine habitats and fish biomass

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562347
Title:
Avoiding conflicts and protecting coral reefs: Customary management benefits marine habitats and fish biomass
Authors:
Campbell, Stuart J.; Cinner, Joshua E.; Ardiwijaya, Rizya L.; Pardede, Shinta T.; Kartawijaya, Tasrif; Mukmunin, Ahmad; Herdiana, Yudi; Hoey, Andrew; Pratchett, Morgan S.; Baird, Andrew Hamilton
Abstract:
Abstract One of the major goals of coral reef conservation is to determine the most effective means of managing marine resources in regions where economic conditions often limit the options available. For example, no-take fishing areas can be impractical in regions where people rely heavily on reef fish for food. In this study we test whether coral reef health differed among areas with varying management practices and socio-economic conditions on Pulau Weh in the Indonesian province of Aceh. Our results show that gear restrictions, in particular prohibiting the use of nets, were successful in minimizing habitat degradation and maintaining fish biomass despite ongoing access to the fishery. Reef fish biomass and hard-coral cover were two- to eight-fold higher at sites where fishing nets were prohibited. The guiding principle of the local customary management system, Panglima Laot, is to reduce conflict among community members over access to marine resources. Consequently, conservation benefits in Aceh have arisen from a customary system that lacks a specific environmental ethic or the means for strong resource-based management. Panglima Laot includes many of the features of successful institutions, such as clearly defined membership rights and the opportunity for resource users to be involved in making, enforcing and changing the rules. Such mechanisms to reduce conflict are the key to the success of marine resource management, particularly in settings that lack resources for enforcement. © 2012 Fauna & Flora International.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (CUP)
Journal:
ORYX
Issue Date:
Oct-2012
DOI:
10.1017/S0030605312000348
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00306053
Sponsors:
Funding for this project was provided by The Kerzner Foundation and The National Fisheries and Wildlife Foundation. We acknowledge the Pulau Weh fishing communities for allowing us to use information on their socio-economic status. We also thank Dodent Mahyiddin from Rubiah Tirta Divers and Nur Fadli and Dr Edi Rudi from Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh, for their assistance and help with local logistics and knowledge.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Stuart J.en
dc.contributor.authorCinner, Joshua E.en
dc.contributor.authorArdiwijaya, Rizya L.en
dc.contributor.authorPardede, Shinta T.en
dc.contributor.authorKartawijaya, Tasrifen
dc.contributor.authorMukmunin, Ahmaden
dc.contributor.authorHerdiana, Yudien
dc.contributor.authorHoey, Andrewen
dc.contributor.authorPratchett, Morgan S.en
dc.contributor.authorBaird, Andrew Hamiltonen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T10:01:51Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T10:01:51Zen
dc.date.issued2012-10en
dc.identifier.issn00306053en
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0030605312000348en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562347en
dc.description.abstractAbstract One of the major goals of coral reef conservation is to determine the most effective means of managing marine resources in regions where economic conditions often limit the options available. For example, no-take fishing areas can be impractical in regions where people rely heavily on reef fish for food. In this study we test whether coral reef health differed among areas with varying management practices and socio-economic conditions on Pulau Weh in the Indonesian province of Aceh. Our results show that gear restrictions, in particular prohibiting the use of nets, were successful in minimizing habitat degradation and maintaining fish biomass despite ongoing access to the fishery. Reef fish biomass and hard-coral cover were two- to eight-fold higher at sites where fishing nets were prohibited. The guiding principle of the local customary management system, Panglima Laot, is to reduce conflict among community members over access to marine resources. Consequently, conservation benefits in Aceh have arisen from a customary system that lacks a specific environmental ethic or the means for strong resource-based management. Panglima Laot includes many of the features of successful institutions, such as clearly defined membership rights and the opportunity for resource users to be involved in making, enforcing and changing the rules. Such mechanisms to reduce conflict are the key to the success of marine resource management, particularly in settings that lack resources for enforcement. © 2012 Fauna & Flora International.en
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding for this project was provided by The Kerzner Foundation and The National Fisheries and Wildlife Foundation. We acknowledge the Pulau Weh fishing communities for allowing us to use information on their socio-economic status. We also thank Dodent Mahyiddin from Rubiah Tirta Divers and Nur Fadli and Dr Edi Rudi from Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh, for their assistance and help with local logistics and knowledge.en
dc.publisherCambridge University Press (CUP)en
dc.subjectAcehen
dc.subjectCoral reefsen
dc.subjectFisheriesen
dc.subjectGear restrictionsen
dc.subjectIndonesiaen
dc.subjectMarine protected areasen
dc.subjectPanglima Laoten
dc.titleAvoiding conflicts and protecting coral reefs: Customary management benefits marine habitats and fish biomassen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalORYXen
dc.contributor.institutionWildlife Conservation Society, Indonesia Marine Program, Bogor, Indonesiaen
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Marine and Tropical Marine Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionNature Conservancy, Indonesia Marine Program, Sanur-Denpasar, Indonesiaen
kaust.authorHoey, Andrewen
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