Preparation of porous polymer monoliths featuring enhanced surface coverage with gold nanoparticles

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562343
Title:
Preparation of porous polymer monoliths featuring enhanced surface coverage with gold nanoparticles
Authors:
Lv, Yongqin; Alejandro, Fernando Maya; Frechet, Jean ( 0000-0001-6419-0163 ) ; Švec, František
Abstract:
A new approach to the preparation of porous polymer monoliths with enhanced coverage of pore surface with gold nanoparticles has been developed. First, a generic poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith was reacted with cystamine followed by the cleavage of its disulfide bonds with tris(2-carboxylethyl)phosphine, which liberated the desired thiol groups. Dispersions of gold nanoparticles with sizes varying from 5 to 40. nm were then pumped through the functionalized monoliths. The materials were then analyzed using both energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. We found that the quantity of attached gold was dependent on the size of nanoparticles, with the maximum attachment of more than 60. wt% being achieved with 40. nm nanoparticles. Scanning electron micrographs of the cross sections of all the monoliths revealed the formation of a non-aggregated, homogenous monolayer of nanoparticles. The surface of the bound gold was functionalized with 1-octanethiol and 1-octadecanethiol, and these monolithic columns were used successfully for the separations of proteins in reversed phase mode. The best separations were obtained using monoliths modified with 15, 20, and 30. nm nanoparticles since these sizes produced the most dense coverage of pore surface with gold. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.
KAUST Department:
Chemical Science Program; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Journal of Chromatography A
Issue Date:
Oct-2012
DOI:
10.1016/j.chroma.2012.04.007
PubMed ID:
22542442
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3424317
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00219673
Sponsors:
All experimental and characterization work performed at the Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and F.S. were supported by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Scientific User Facilities Division of the U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. The financial support of Y.L. and J.F. by a grant from the National Institute of Health (GM48364) is gratefully acknowledged.
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3424317
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Chemical Science Program

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLv, Yongqinen
dc.contributor.authorAlejandro, Fernando Mayaen
dc.contributor.authorFrechet, Jeanen
dc.contributor.authorŠvec, Františeken
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T10:01:41Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T10:01:41Zen
dc.date.issued2012-10en
dc.identifier.issn00219673en
dc.identifier.pmid22542442en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chroma.2012.04.007en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562343en
dc.description.abstractA new approach to the preparation of porous polymer monoliths with enhanced coverage of pore surface with gold nanoparticles has been developed. First, a generic poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith was reacted with cystamine followed by the cleavage of its disulfide bonds with tris(2-carboxylethyl)phosphine, which liberated the desired thiol groups. Dispersions of gold nanoparticles with sizes varying from 5 to 40. nm were then pumped through the functionalized monoliths. The materials were then analyzed using both energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. We found that the quantity of attached gold was dependent on the size of nanoparticles, with the maximum attachment of more than 60. wt% being achieved with 40. nm nanoparticles. Scanning electron micrographs of the cross sections of all the monoliths revealed the formation of a non-aggregated, homogenous monolayer of nanoparticles. The surface of the bound gold was functionalized with 1-octanethiol and 1-octadecanethiol, and these monolithic columns were used successfully for the separations of proteins in reversed phase mode. The best separations were obtained using monoliths modified with 15, 20, and 30. nm nanoparticles since these sizes produced the most dense coverage of pore surface with gold. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.en
dc.description.sponsorshipAll experimental and characterization work performed at the Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and F.S. were supported by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Scientific User Facilities Division of the U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. The financial support of Y.L. and J.F. by a grant from the National Institute of Health (GM48364) is gratefully acknowledged.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3424317en
dc.subjectGold nanoparticlesen
dc.subjectPolymer monolithen
dc.subjectProtein separationen
dc.subjectReversed phaseen
dc.titlePreparation of porous polymer monoliths featuring enhanced surface coverage with gold nanoparticlesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentChemical Science Programen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Chromatography Aen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3424317en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionThe Molecular Foundry, E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, United Statesen
kaust.authorFrechet, Jeanen
All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.