The coral triangle initiative: What are we missing? A case study from Aceh

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562341
Title:
The coral triangle initiative: What are we missing? A case study from Aceh
Authors:
Rudi, Edi; Campbell, Stuart J.; Hoey, Andrew; Fadli, Nur; Linkie, Matthew; Baird, Andrew Hamilton
Abstract:
Abstract The Coral Triangle Initiative is an ambitious attempt to conserve the marine biodiversity hotspot known as the Coral Triangle. However, the reef fauna in many nearby regions remains poorly explored and, consequently, the focus on the Coral Triangle risks overlooking other areas of high conservation significance. One region of potential significance, Aceh, Indonesia, has not been visited by coral taxonomists since the Dutch colonial period. Here we document the species richness of scleractinian corals of Pulau Weh, Aceh. We also compare the species richness of the genus Acropora at 3-5 sites in each of nine regions in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Although dominated by widespread Indo-Pacific species, the coral fauna of Pulau Weh is also the eastern and western boundary for many Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean species, respectively. We identified a total of 133 scleractinian species, of which three have been previously recorded only in the western Indian Ocean and five are presently undescribed. The mean species richness of the Acropora at Pulau Weh is similar to regions within the Coral Triangle. This high species richness plus the high proportion of endemics suggests that the Andaman Sea is of similarly high conservation value to the Coral Triangle. We suggest that an international initiative similar to the Coral Triangle Initiative is required to conserve this region, which includes the territorial waters of six countries. © 2012 Fauna & Flora International.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (CUP)
Journal:
ORYX
Issue Date:
Oct-2012
DOI:
10.1017/S0030605312000178
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00306053
Sponsors:
The research was supported by an International Collaborative Grant for International Publication Batch II from the Director General of Higher Education, Department of National Education Indonesia (Contract number: 656/SP2H/PP/DP2M/VII/2009, 30/07/2009). WCS was supported by the Kezler Foundation. We thank Fauna & Flora International for logistical support on Pulau Weh.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRudi, Edien
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Stuart J.en
dc.contributor.authorHoey, Andrewen
dc.contributor.authorFadli, Nuren
dc.contributor.authorLinkie, Matthewen
dc.contributor.authorBaird, Andrew Hamiltonen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T10:01:36Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T10:01:36Zen
dc.date.issued2012-10en
dc.identifier.issn00306053en
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0030605312000178en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562341en
dc.description.abstractAbstract The Coral Triangle Initiative is an ambitious attempt to conserve the marine biodiversity hotspot known as the Coral Triangle. However, the reef fauna in many nearby regions remains poorly explored and, consequently, the focus on the Coral Triangle risks overlooking other areas of high conservation significance. One region of potential significance, Aceh, Indonesia, has not been visited by coral taxonomists since the Dutch colonial period. Here we document the species richness of scleractinian corals of Pulau Weh, Aceh. We also compare the species richness of the genus Acropora at 3-5 sites in each of nine regions in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Although dominated by widespread Indo-Pacific species, the coral fauna of Pulau Weh is also the eastern and western boundary for many Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean species, respectively. We identified a total of 133 scleractinian species, of which three have been previously recorded only in the western Indian Ocean and five are presently undescribed. The mean species richness of the Acropora at Pulau Weh is similar to regions within the Coral Triangle. This high species richness plus the high proportion of endemics suggests that the Andaman Sea is of similarly high conservation value to the Coral Triangle. We suggest that an international initiative similar to the Coral Triangle Initiative is required to conserve this region, which includes the territorial waters of six countries. © 2012 Fauna & Flora International.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research was supported by an International Collaborative Grant for International Publication Batch II from the Director General of Higher Education, Department of National Education Indonesia (Contract number: 656/SP2H/PP/DP2M/VII/2009, 30/07/2009). WCS was supported by the Kezler Foundation. We thank Fauna & Flora International for logistical support on Pulau Weh.en
dc.publisherCambridge University Press (CUP)en
dc.subjectAcehen
dc.subjectBiodiversityen
dc.subjectConservationen
dc.subjectCoral reefsen
dc.subjectCoral Triangle Initiativeen
dc.titleThe coral triangle initiative: What are we missing? A case study from Acehen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalORYXen
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Marine and Fisheries Studies, Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh, Aceh, Indonesiaen
dc.contributor.institutionWildlife Conservation Society, Bogor, Indonesiaen
dc.contributor.institutionARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionFauna and Flora International, Kuta Alam Lampriet, Banda Aceh, Indonesiaen
kaust.authorHoey, Andrewen
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