Performance of triple bagging hermetic technology for postharvest storage of cowpea grain in Niger

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562339
Title:
Performance of triple bagging hermetic technology for postharvest storage of cowpea grain in Niger
Authors:
Baoua, Ibrahim B.; Margam, Venu; Amadou, Laouali; Murdock, Larry L.
Abstract:
Triple bagging technology for protecting postharvest cowpea grain from losses to the bruchid, Callosobruchus maculatus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) is currently being adopted on a fairly large scale in ten West and Central African countries, including Niger. The triple bag consists of two inner high-density polyethylene bags acting as oxygen barriers, which in turn are encased in an outer woven polypropylene bag that serves primarily for mechanical strength. These hermetic bags, available in either 50 or 100 kg capacity, are called Purdue Improved Cowpea Storage (PICS) bags. Adoption of PICS technology in West and Central Africa has been driven by its effectiveness, simplicity, low cost, durability, and manufacture within the region. From surveys on adoption we discovered that farmers have begun to re-use bags they had used the previous year or even the previous two years. In the present study, we compared the performance of three different types of PICS bags: (1) new 50 kg (2) new 100 kg bags and (3) once-used 50 kg bags, all filled with naturally infested untreated cowpeas. In these PICS bags the O 2 levels within the bags initially fell to about 3 percent (v/v) while the CO 2 rose to nearly 5 percent (v/v). After five months of storage, new and used 50 kg bags and new 100 kg bags preserved the grain equally well. There were greatly reduced numbers of adults and larvae in the PICS bags versus the controls, which consisted of grain stored in single layer woven bags. The proportion of grain having C. maculatus emergence holes after five months of storage in PICS bags was little changed from that found when the grain was first put into the bags. The PICS technology is practical and useful in Sahelian conditions and can contribute to improved farmers' incomes as well as increase availability of high quality, insecticide-free cowpea grain as food. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
KAUST Department:
Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Journal of Stored Products Research
Issue Date:
Oct-2012
DOI:
10.1016/j.jspr.2012.07.003
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0022474X
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBaoua, Ibrahim B.en
dc.contributor.authorMargam, Venuen
dc.contributor.authorAmadou, Laoualien
dc.contributor.authorMurdock, Larry L.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T10:01:32Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T10:01:32Zen
dc.date.issued2012-10en
dc.identifier.issn0022474Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jspr.2012.07.003en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562339en
dc.description.abstractTriple bagging technology for protecting postharvest cowpea grain from losses to the bruchid, Callosobruchus maculatus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) is currently being adopted on a fairly large scale in ten West and Central African countries, including Niger. The triple bag consists of two inner high-density polyethylene bags acting as oxygen barriers, which in turn are encased in an outer woven polypropylene bag that serves primarily for mechanical strength. These hermetic bags, available in either 50 or 100 kg capacity, are called Purdue Improved Cowpea Storage (PICS) bags. Adoption of PICS technology in West and Central Africa has been driven by its effectiveness, simplicity, low cost, durability, and manufacture within the region. From surveys on adoption we discovered that farmers have begun to re-use bags they had used the previous year or even the previous two years. In the present study, we compared the performance of three different types of PICS bags: (1) new 50 kg (2) new 100 kg bags and (3) once-used 50 kg bags, all filled with naturally infested untreated cowpeas. In these PICS bags the O 2 levels within the bags initially fell to about 3 percent (v/v) while the CO 2 rose to nearly 5 percent (v/v). After five months of storage, new and used 50 kg bags and new 100 kg bags preserved the grain equally well. There were greatly reduced numbers of adults and larvae in the PICS bags versus the controls, which consisted of grain stored in single layer woven bags. The proportion of grain having C. maculatus emergence holes after five months of storage in PICS bags was little changed from that found when the grain was first put into the bags. The PICS technology is practical and useful in Sahelian conditions and can contribute to improved farmers' incomes as well as increase availability of high quality, insecticide-free cowpea grain as food. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectBruchidsen
dc.subjectCallosobruchus maculatusen
dc.subjectCowpeaen
dc.subjectHermeticen
dc.subjectPostharvesten
dc.subjectStorageen
dc.subjectTriple bagen
dc.titlePerformance of triple bagging hermetic technology for postharvest storage of cowpea grain in Nigeren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentComputational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Stored Products Researchen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitut National de la Recherche Agronomique du Niger (INRAN), BP 240, Maradi, Nigeren
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Entomology, Purdue University, 901 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United Statesen
kaust.authorMargam, Venuen
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